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Rogue Riddle 1020 -- What's In a Name? -- Reveal and Winner Declared.


Lars Hanson
 

All,
 
   After flying in for  a single foray, our Learless Feeder faded out.  Perhaps there was insufficient fuel?  In any event, Chris and Kirk continued to duel for the lead.   As of this morning, Kirk was barely in the lead, but then he drew ahead during the morning.  Chris came in with a late surge this afternoon, however, and almost managed to tie Kirk.  Still, in the end Kirk held the lead by a single riddle.

 

    Kirk is this week’s winner, and will host Rogue Riddle #1021 this coming weekend.

 

Herewith are the final riddle stats (3 players):


     3 correct -   3:   1, 16, 18

     2 correct -   9:   2, 4- 6, 8, 9, 19, 24, 26

      1 correct -   8:   3, 14, 15, 20, 22, 23, 29, 30

     0 correct – 11:   7, 10 - 13, 17, 21, 25, 27, 28, 31  

No guesses -  10:   10, 11, 13, 21, 25, 28, 31


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Rogue Riddle #1018
What’s in a Name?


    What’s in a name?  Many things.  To simplify things, initially one might well look for the usual suspects, particularly in this potpourri.  Something to keep in mind while attacking this week’s offering . . . .
 
    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of thirty-one riddles, which may seem overly long.  The reason for the number of riddles should become apparent as one solves the riddles.  Except for three daffynitions, each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Some are in the form of daffynitions while others are not.  And there are one or two Spoonerisms thrown in for good measure. As an example of homophones:
 
Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did __________   become the first person to __________  .
A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT
 
    Note that the indicator “__________  ” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the “__________ ” may be preceded by the article “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word or words the “__________ ” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”
 
    Where two answers are indicated, both are required for full credit
 
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  As you solve the riddles, a pattern should begin to emerge.  This will help with answering some of the other riddles.  
 
    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1021 next week.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
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1.  His stomach discomfort definitely was a GAS TRICK / GASTRIC condition.

     G
 
2.  That bitter Balkan native certainly is A SERB / ACERB

     A
 
3.  RECITAL / RECITE ALL – An occasion to read every bit of the poetry while on stage.

      R
 
4.  She regularly contradicts herself.   For instance, she said, “No” YESTERDAY and “YES” TODAY.

      Y
 
5.  HOARFROST / WHORE FROST -- A chilly morning reception from a woman of the night.

     H

 
6.  In the church, they finally located the crafty KNAVE in the NAVE.

      K
 
7.  The copy which turned everything on its head proved quite popular.  The INVERSION quickly became the  “IN” VERSION .

      I
 
8.  An appropriate term for an afternoon service at Buckingham Palace – ROYAL TEA / ROYALTY

      R
 
9.  “It’s time to slay that sea monster!” the sailors roared. “Let’s get KRAKEN / CRACKIN’”

       K
 
10.  Quite appropriately, December is a CAL ENDER/ CALENDAR month.

       C
 
11.  Why are timorous Senate interns like an old business reference?  Both are the YELLOW PAGES.

       Y
 
12.  The demise of the Almighty is a NIETZSCHE/ NICHEidea.

       N
 
13.  Quite appropriately, a trader uses MERCHANT EYES to see MERCHANDISE.

       M

 
14.  Appropriately, Henry worked hard to ensure everyone could AFFORD A FORD.

        A
 
15.  CAROUSAL/ CAROUSEL– A college kegger at an amusement park.

        C
 
16.  After slaying and consuming the lioness in the arena, the GLADIATOR found he was GLAD ‘E ATE ‘ER (or GLAD HE ATE HER).

       G
 
17.  ARCHERY– A notable feature of the Grand Mosque of Córdoba.

        A
 
18.  The landlord decided to RE-LEASE/ RELEASE the refurbished flat.

        R
 
19.  What is that line on the graph?  Y-AXIS . / WHY ASK US ?

        Y
 
20.  I was fatigued yesterday, and I am again today.  I am definitely RE-TIRED/ RETIRED.

         R
 
21.  JUGULAR– Shaped like a small-mouthed earthenware container.

        J
 
22.  His enlistment was not his choice.   It was INVOLUNTARY.  He was not IN VOLUNTARY service.
        (11 / 2, 9)

        I
 
23.  MASTECTOMY – The removal of a sailing vessel’s support for its means of propulsion.

        M
 
24.  At the busy shipyard, at noon workers often are out to LAUNCH / LUNCH.

         L
 
25.  AQUA LINE/ AQUILINE -- The eagle followed the brook’s path.

        A
 
26.  Old Norse poets did their best work on cold winter mornings.  That was when they found their RIME / RHYME.

         R
 
27.  What is the difference between the fruit of a plant and a bit of soil “anointed” by a drunk Irishman?  One is a SEEDPOD (or SEED POD), while the other is PEED SOD.

        S
 
28.  What is the difference between a heavy weight and guests at a party avoiding a rich cake?  One is a SHORT TON, while the other is a TORTE SHUN.

         S
 
29.  “Beware that flirtatious woman!  She is a TEASER / TEASE, SIR!”

         T
 
30.  AERODYNAMICS / ERROR DYNAMICS – Study of the causes for the two Boeing 737 MAX crashes.

        A
 
31.  At the darkest hour, the alchemist sought an effective ceremony for producing a nitrogenous compound.  He sought a NIGHT RITE / NITRITE.

        N
 
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    Thank you all for playing.
 
    Take it away with Rogue Riddle #1021 this weekend, Kirk!

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

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