name for cat FIDOs


James Ertner
 

I will remain MEOWt on the subject.

Jim
=======================
 

What's with all the idle c(h)atter about cats? Don't you know you're merely spoiling all the good ideas for riddles!


Also I wish everyone would please stop passing along references to "cat FIDO's."  Beside the obliviously callous apostrophe abuse, these are "F-Riddles." Calling riddle from the new series a "cat FIDO" is akin to making reference to a "real fictional character." Just makes no sense to meow tall.

Gary Hallock


On May 13, 2014, at 1:39 PM, chasmwuk@... [puny] wrote:

 

As an English teacher, I like the following oldie:


What's the difference between a cat and a comma?

A comma is a pause at the end of a clause, whereas a cat has its claws at the end of its paws.

Charles


=======================================

 
Joseph,
    Could have been petiatrists.  Or, even more appropriately, pawdiatrists.
    Might one consider the study of furniture in a house with cats scientific?   After all, that certainly would involve studying claws and effect.
Lars





Lars Hanson
 

Gary,

    The correct (according to several usage and style manuals) plural of an acronym is formed by adding apostrophe s ('s) at the end.

    Following that rule, "FIDO's" is the correct plural form.

    I suspect that over time, as Americans become increasingly ignorant of that usage, the usage may well change.

    As for "exhausting" cat puns, are we really so devoid of imagination?  Or perhaps does the subject of  cats offer a pawsity of puns?

    Aloha,

        Lars

==================

   

On May 13, 2014 3:04 PM, "jde31459@... [puny]" <puny@...> wrote:
 

I will remain MEOWt on the subject.

Jim
=======================
 

What's with all the idle c(h)atter about cats? Don't you know you're merely spoiling all the good ideas for riddles!


Also I wish everyone would please stop passing along references to "cat FIDO's."  Beside the obliviously callous apostrophe abuse, these are "F-Riddles." Calling riddle from the new series a "cat FIDO" is akin to making reference to a "real fictional character." Just makes no sense to meow tall.

Gary Hallock


On May 13, 2014, at 1:39 PM, chasmwuk@... [puny] wrote:

 

As an English teacher, I like the following oldie:


What's the difference between a cat and a comma?

A comma is a pause at the end of a clause, whereas a cat has its claws at the end of its paws.

Charles


=======================================

 
Joseph,
    Could have been petiatrists.  Or, even more appropriately, pawdiatrists.
    Might one consider the study of furniture in a house with cats scientific?   After all, that certainly would involve studying claws and effect.
Lars





James Ertner
 

You’re right, Lars. It would be a catastrophe and a cataclysm if we couldn't come up with a catalog of cat puns.

Jim
======================
 

Gary,

    The correct (according to several usage and style manuals) plural of an acronym is formed by adding apostrophe s ('s) at the end.

    Following that rule, "FIDO's" is the correct plural form.

    I suspect that over time, as Americans become increasingly ignorant of that usage, the usage may well change.

    As for "exhausting" cat puns, are we really so devoid of imagination?  Or perhaps does the subject of  cats offer a pawsity of puns?

    Aloha,

        Lars

==================

I will remain MEOWt on the subject.

Jim
=======================
 

What's with all the idle c(h)atter about cats? Don't you know you're merely spoiling all the good ideas for riddles!


Also I wish everyone would please stop passing along references to "cat FIDO's."  Beside the obliviously callous apostrophe abuse, these are "F-Riddles." Calling riddle from the new series a "cat FIDO" is akin to making reference to a "real fictional character." Just makes no sense to meow tall.

Gary Hallock
=======================
      

As an English teacher, I like the following oldie:


What's the difference between a cat and a comma?

A comma is a pause at the end of a clause, whereas a cat has its claws at the end of its paws.

Charles

=======================================

 
Joseph,
    Could have been petiatrists.  Or, even more appropriately, pawdiatrists.
    Might one consider the study of furniture in a house with cats scientific?   After all, that certainly would involve studying claws and effect.
Lars