Date   

Rogue Riddle 1001 - Status 7 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

   Kirk still has 8 kills (40%) and continues to hold the lead.  Erika now has taken second place with seven kills (35%), putting Cyn in third place with six kills (30%), One Sagan and Jim Ertner in that order.  So far thirteen different riddles of the twenty have fallen.

 

    Given that Erika has continued to make progress on this week’s Rogue Riddle, I have elected to extend the deadline another 24 hours, until tomorrow (Wednesday) at 5:00 p.m. EST.

 

   Riddle status:

 

4 correct – 1:  4

3 correct – 3:  11, 12, 14

2 correct – 3:  13, 15, 17

1 correct –  6:  1, 8, 9, 16, 18, 19

0 correct – 7:  2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 20

 

No guesses – 3: 3, 20

 

Clues:

 

Hint:  Pay close attention to the wording -- in most cases it has been carefully chosen.

 

Hint:  One layer has claimed scant knowledge of Shakespeare, but no detailed knowledge of Shakespeare is required to solve these riddles.  As I noted in responding:

 

While you may not be up on your Shakespeare, many of his expressions have made it into common English (including American English!) usage.  None of the answers requires a thorough knowledge of Shakespeare, so the references to the Bard really only serve as additional hints.

 

    For instance, I’m sure you have heard of such phrases as “To be or not to be,” which is the beginning of Hamlet’s soliloquy.  Or “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo?” from Romeo and Juliet.  (Neither of which is in the riddles.)

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are included below.

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the next five riddles are included below.

    In addition,  #2 has been reworded slightly to provide a hint.

 

Clue Set #3:  Letter counts for the remaining riddles are included below.

    In addition, there are clues for the three riddles no one has yet attempted.

 

Clue Set #4:  Clues are provided below for the rest of the riddles yet to be answered by anyone.

 

    Aloha,

 

        Lars

 

=================================

 

Rogue Riddle 1001

Yet Another Potpourri

 

    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

 

Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

 

Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 

Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

 

    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

(3, 4, 2, 1, 7 / 3, 4, 2, 1, 7)

 

2.  As he struggled with the extraction, the determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

(3, 5, 4, 3 / 3, 5, 4, 3)

What is the dentist trying to do?  What would be the desired result?

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

(3, 3, 7/ 3, 3, 7)

What’s another word for luggage?  Railroads used to have a car for this.

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

(8, 5 / 8-5 or 13)

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

(4, 2, 2, 5 / 3, 2, 2, 4)

A phrase used to cut off objections or qualifications.

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

(7, 5, 1, 4 / 7, 5, 1, 4)

Where is the milkmaid?  What else is there which might cause the problem?

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

(5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 5)

The phrase sought here refers to, “A debt or punishment, especially a cruel or unreasonable one, that is harshly insisted upon.”

 

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

(4, 2, 2 / 3, 2, 2)

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

(5, 2, 4, 3 / 5, 2, 7)

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

(4, 6, 7, 4, 7 / 4, 6, 7, 4, 7)

What was he doing?  What was the response? Who won the exchange?

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?

(1’2, 3, 3 / 6)

 

12.  The mine has played out?

(3, 4 / 6)

 

13.  A bounding coast?

(4 / 5)

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

(2’2, 5 / 8)

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

(5, 4 / 8)

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

(3’1, 7 / 4, 7)

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

(3, 2, 3, 4 / 3, 2, 3, 5)

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

(4, 2, 6 / 12)

This involves the names of an actress and a philosopher.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom’s and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

(3, 7 / 4, 6)

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

(3, 4 / 3, 4)

The answer to this involves an imminent holiday.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   

 

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.

 

    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!

 

    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Have fun!

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


HAPPY BARD DAY

Cynthia MacGregor
 

Happy Bard Day, Bob Dvorak. Maya (or May yew) Shake your speare in whatever direction suits you, whether that is a 3-piece suit or a two-peas suit or a one-pees soot (and if you’re peeing soot, you’d better see a meaty urologist)

 

Make it a splendiferous day!

 

Cynthia ("Cyn") MacGregor

Freelance writer/editor

www.cynthiamacgregor.com

 

Pass a smile along


Rogue Riddle 1001 - Status & Clue Set 4 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

   Erika now has moved up to second place, tied with Cyn. Kirk still has 8 kills (40%) and continues to hold the lead.  Cyn Mac and Erika each have six kills (30%), One Sagan and Jim Ertner in that order.  So far eleven different riddles of the twenty have fallen.

 

Riddle status:

 

4 correct – 1:  4

3 correct – 3:  11, 12, 14

2 correct – 3:  13, 17

1 correct –  5:  1, 8, 9, 15, 16, 19

0 correct – 8:  2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 18, 20

 

No guesses – 3: 3, 18, 20

 

Clues:

 

Hint:  Pay close attention to the wording -- in most cases it has been carefully chosen.

 

Hint:  One layer has claimed scant knowledge of Shakespeare, but no detailed knowledge of Shakespeare is required to solve these riddles.  As I noted in responding:

 

While you may not be up on your Shakespeare, many of his expressions have made it into common English (including American English!) usage.  None of the answers requires a thorough knowledge of Shakespeare, so the references to the Bard really only serve as additional hints.

 

    For instance, I’m sure you have heard of such phrases as “To be or not to be,” which is the beginning of Hamlet’s soliloquy.  Or “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo?” from Romeo and Juliet.  (Neither of which is in the riddles.)

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are included below.

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the next five riddles are included below.

    In addition,  #2 has been reworded slightly to provide a hint.

 

Clue Set #3:  Letter counts for the remaining riddles are included below.

    In addition, there are clues for the three riddles no one has yet attempted.

 

Clue Set #4:  Clues are provided below for the rest of the riddles yet to be answered by anyone.

 

    Aloha,

 

        Lars

 

=================================

 

Rogue Riddle 1001

Yet Another Potpourri

 

    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:

  • Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

  • The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

  • Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 

Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

  • Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

(3, 4, 2, 1, 7 / 3, 4, 2, 1, 7)

 

2.  As he struggled with the extraction, the determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

(3, 5, 4, 3 / 3, 5, 4, 3)

What is the dentist trying to do?  What would be the desired result?

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

(3, 3, 7/ 3, 3, 7)

What’s another word for luggage?

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

(8, 5 / 8-5 or 13)

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

(4, 2, 2, 5 / 3, 2, 2, 4)

A phrase used to cut off objections or qualifications.

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

(7, 5, 1, 4 / 7, 5, 1, 4)

Where is the milkmaid?  What else is there which might cause the problem?

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

(5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 5)

The phrase sought here refers to, “A debt or punishment, especially a cruel or unreasonable one, that is harshly insisted upon.”

 

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

(4, 2, 2 / 3, 2, 2)

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

(5, 2, 4, 3 / 5, 2, 7)

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

(4, 6, 7, 4, 7 / 4, 6, 7, 4, 7)

What was he doing?  What was the response? Who won the exchange?

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?

(1’2, 3, 3 / 6)

 

12.  The mine has played out?

(3, 4 / 6)

 

13.  A bounding coast?

(4 / 5)

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

(2’2, 5 / 8)

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

(5, 4 / 8)

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

(3’1, 7 / 4, 7)

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

(3, 2, 3, 4 / 3, 2, 3, 5)

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

(4, 2, 6 / 12)

This involves the names of an actress and a philosopher.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom’s and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

(3, 7 / 4, 6)

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

(3, 4 / 3, 4)

The answer to this involves an imminent holiday.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   

 

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.

 

    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!

 

    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Have fun!

 

    Aloha,

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1001 - Clue Set 3 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    There now are five players, with Erika having joined the fray with five kills.  She is the first to solve any of the limericks.  Kirk now has 8 kills (40%) and continues to hold the lead.  Cyn Mac has six kills (30%), followed closely by Erika with five (25%), then One Sagan and Jim Ertner in that order.  So far eleven different riddles of the twenty have fallen.

 

Riddle status:

 

4 correct – 1:  4

3 correct – 3:  11, 12, 14

2 correct – 2:  13, 17

1 correct –  5:  1, 8, 9, 15, 19

0 correct – 9:  2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 16, 18, 20

 

No guesses – 3: 3, 18, 20

 

Clues:

 

Hint:  Pay close attention to the wording -- in most cases it has been carefully chosen.

 

Hint:  One layer has claimed scant knowledge of Shakespeare, but no detailed knowledge of Shakespeare is required to solve these riddles.  As I noted in responding:

 

While you may not be up on your Shakespeare, many of his expressions have made it into common English (including American English!) usage.  None of the answers requires a thorough knowledge of Shakespeare, so the references to the Bard really only serve as additional hints.

 

    For instance, I’m sure you have heard of such phrases as “To be or not to be,” which is the beginning of Hamlet’s soliloquy.  Or “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo?” from Romeo and Juliet.  (Neither of which is in the riddles.)

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are included below.

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the next five riddles are included below.

    In addition,  #2 has been reworded slightly to provide a hint.

 

Clue Set #3:  Letter counts for the remaining riddles are included below.

    In addition, there are clues for the three riddles no one has yet attempted.

 

    Aloha,

 

        Lars

 

=================================

 

Rogue Riddle 1001

Yet Another Potpourri

 

    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

 

Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

 

Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 

Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

 

    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

(3, 4, 2, 1, 7 / 3, 4, 2, 1, 7)

 

2.  As he struggled with the extraction, the determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

(3, 5, 4, 3 / 3, 5, 4, 3)

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

(3, 3, 7/ 3, 3, 7)

What’s another word for luggage?

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

(8, 5 / 8-5 or 13)

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

(4, 2, 2, 5 / 3, 2, 2, 4)

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

(7, 5, 1, 4 / 7, 5, 1, 4)

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

(5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 5)

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

(4, 2, 2 / 3, 2, 2)

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

(5, 2, 4, 3 / 5, 2, 7)

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

(4, 6, 7, 4, 7 / 4, 6, 7, 4, 7)

 

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?

(1’2, 3, 3 / 6)

 

12.  The mine has played out?

(3, 4 / 6)

 

13.  A bounding coast?

(4 / 5)

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

(2’2, 5 / 8)

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

(5, 4 / 8)

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

(3’1, 7 / 4, 7)

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

(3, 2, 3, 4 / 3, 2, 3, 5)

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

(4, 2, 6 / 12)

This involves the names of an actress and a philosopher

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom’s and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

(3, 7 / 4, 6)

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

(3, 4 / 3, 4)

The answer to this involves an imminent holiday.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   

 

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.

 

    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!

 

    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Have fun!

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1001 - Clue Set 2 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    There now are four players.  Kirk now has 8 kills (40%) and continues to hold the lead.  Cyn Mac has six kills (30%), followed closely by One Sagan and Jim Ertner in that order.  So far ten different riddles of the twenty have fallen.

 

Riddle status:

 

3 correct – 1:  4

2 correct – 5:  11, 12, 13, 14, 17

1 correct –  4:  1, 9, 15, 19

0 correct – 10:  2, 3, 5 – 8, 10, 16, 18, 20

 

No guesses – 3: 3, 18, 20

 

Clues:

 

Hint:  Pay close attention to the wording -- in most cases it has been carefully chosen.

 

Hint:  One layer has claimed scant knowledge of Shakespeare, but no detailed knowledge of Shakespeare is required to solve these riddles.  As I noted in responding:

 

While you may not be up on your Shakespeare, many of his expressions have made it into common English (including American English!) usage.  None of the answers requires a thorough knowledge of Shakespeare, so the references to the Bard really only serve as additional hints.

 

    For instance, I’m sure you have heard of such phrases as “To be or not to be,” which is the beginning of Hamlet’s soliloquy.  Or “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo?” from Romeo and Juliet.  (Neither of which is in the riddles.)

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are included below.

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the next five riddles are included below.

    In addition,  #2 has been reworded slightly to provide a hint.

 

    Aloha,

 

        Lars

 

=================================

 

Rogue Riddle 1001

Yet Another Potpourri

 

    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

 

Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

 

Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 

Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

 

    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

(3, 4, 2, 1, 7 / 3, 4, 2, 1, 7)

 

2.  As he struggled with the extraction, the determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

(3, 5, 4, 3 / 3, 5, 4, 3)

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

(3, 3, 7/ 3, 3, 7)

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

(8, 5 / 8-5 or 13)

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

(4, 2, 2, 5 / 3, 2, 2, 4)

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

(7, 5, 1, 4 / 7, 5, 1, 4)

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

(5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 5)

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

(4, 2, 2 / 3, 2, 2)

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

(5, 2, 4, 3 / 5, 2, 7)

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

(4, 6, 7, 4, 7 / 4, 6, 7, 4, 7)

 

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?

 

12.  The mine has played out?

 

13.  A bounding coast?

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   

 

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.

 

    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!

 

    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Have fun!

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Re: Rogue Riddle 1001 - Clue Set 1 - #RogueRiddle

Cynthia MacGregor
 

Lars wrote:

 

 One layer has claimed scant knowledge of Shakespeare, 

 

Are you calling us chickens, or is it bricks we lay? Surely the remark was not intended sexually—there was no “<adulterated>” warning

 

Cyn


Re: Rogue Riddle 1001 - Clue Set 1 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    Because of an unintended space in the hashtag in the original post, this post was delayed.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 12:05 PM Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...> wrote:

All,

 

    There now are four players.  Kirk Miller has jumped in with 7 clean kills (35%) and has wrested the lead from Cyn Mac, who has six kills (30%).  Cyn is followed closely by One Sagan and Jim Ertner also are in the race.  So far ten different riddles of the twenty have fallen.

 

    Thanks to Kirk for the reminder to use the hashtag in the subject line as a precaution against public guesses – I had neglected to do so and have corrected that in this update.

 

Riddle status:

 

3 correct – 1:  4

2 correct – 4:  11, 12, 14, 17

1 correct –  5:  1, 9, 13, 15, 19

0 correct – 10:  2, 3, 5 – 8, 10, 16, 18, 20

 

No guesses – 3: 3, 18, 20

  

Clues:

 

Hint:  Pay close attention to the wording -- in most cases it has been carefully chosen.

 

Hint:  One layer has claimed scant knowledge of Shakespeare, but no detailed knowledge of Shakespeare is required to solve these riddles.  As I noted in responding:

 

While you may not be up on your Shakespeare, many of his expressions have made it into common English (including American English!) usage.  None of the answers requires a thorough knowledge of Shakespeare, so the references to the Bard really only serve as additional hints.

 

    For instance, I’m sure you have heard of such phrases as “To be or not to be,” which is the beginning of Hamlet’s soliloquy.  Or “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo?” from Romeo and Juliet.  (Neither of which is in the riddles.)

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are included below.

 

    Aloha,

 

        Lars

 

=================================

 

Rogue Riddle 1001

Yet Another Potpourri

 

    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:

  • Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

  • The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

  • Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 

Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

  • Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

(3, 4, 2, 1, 7 / 3, 4, 2, 1, 7)

 

2.  The determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

(3, 5, 4, 3 / 3, 5, 4, 3)

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

(3, 3, 7/ 3, 3, 7)

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

(8, 5 / 8-5 or 13)

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

(4, 2, 2, 5 / 3, 2, 2, 4)

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

 

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?.

 

12.  The mine has played out?

 

13.  A bounding coast?

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   

 

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.

 

    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!

 

    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Have fun!

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


PUNY Miss Elainey Lives! #administrivia

Lee Jackson
 

Ladles and Jellyspoons, allow me to introduce the PUNY Miss Elainey subgroup! Yes, Miss Elainey is finally up and running for all your non-punny needs. Got a word origin topic? Talk to Miss Elainey! Want to discuss something about the upcoming O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships? Tell it to Miss Elainey!

Joining is simple! Go to https://puny.groups.io/g/MissElainey and sign up today. Your first message might be moderated if Gary, Lars, or I can't clear your message Mod bit quickly enough, but no biggie - we'll get it handled for you! And yes, unfortunately, you *do* have to join - membership does *not* automatically come with membership in the PUNY main group or the L&H subgroup.

So, why wait? Join Miss Elainey today! You'll be glad you did. No money down, no financing charges for 90 days! Offer not valid in Oklahoma.

--
Lee Jackson, PUNY group Administrangler
Visit the PUNY and O. Henry Museum Web Sites!
http://punpunpun.com
http://www.austintexas.gov/department/o-henry-museum
https://www.facebook.com/groups/punoff/


Re: lettuce alone

joseph h
 

The ship's kitchen ran out of Romaine and, since there was a high demand for salad, the chef hit the iceberg.

Joseph

=====

My wife misses Romaine lettuce so much that's she's starting to have dreams where she "Sees-her" Salads again


I was right in the middle of making a salad when I first heard about the diseased Romaine, so I decided to toss it.

Doug S.
==============
Once Romaine is deemed safe again,we can spinach and every day enjoying a Caesar Salad without fear.

Doug S.
=========
Depart mint is what airlines give you before a flight.

Fly light is what fireflies  have in their tails.

GR
=============



I think the USDA should fire whoever's the head of lettuce Department

Doug S.
============

According to the CDC, lettuce diseases could increase in 2020 and what we're experiencing now is just the tip of the iceberg

Doug Spector
.
============

I couldn’t resist adding a haiku ...

West coast clergy were 
Asked to bless new Romaine crop;
“Dear Lord, lettuce spray ... “

CG

On Nov 29, 2019, at 11:21 AM, Cynthia MacGregor <cynthia@...> wrote:


Let’s pin each of you down so there are no mishaps.
Cyn
 
You guys kale me! Just don't climb up the cliff endive!
 
(Erika forgot to sign her name)
 
The news about the e.coli has leeked out, but there is safe lettuce growing up the mountain if you would scale yon cliff to reach it. The stores are charging raddichio-lous prices for produce but come and put your best Bibb on and have a meal with me.
 
Cyn
 
 
To mato or not to mato; that is the question. I have tossed about pondering it, but I am not concerned about a dressing down if I get it wrong.
 
Here I am One Sagan
 
 
On Friday, November 29, 2019, 03:55:29 PM UTC, gary hallock <gary@...> wrote:
 
 
Whether or not giving up lettuce will allow you to get a head still Romaines to be seen. There is not a lot of salad evidence.
 
Gary Hallock
 
=================
 
Hope everyone heard about the E.coli outbreak and threw away any Romaine lettuce...unless you're wanting a Seizure Salad
 
Doug Spector
 


Rogue Riddle 1001 - Yet Another Potpourri - Stsus Update 2

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    Back at the computer.  Just saw The Woman in Black, superbly done  play at the Shakespeare Theater Company here in DC.

    Here is an updated status:

    So far, still just two players.  Cyn Mac is in the lead with six kills (30%) and One Sagan is in second place with 2 kills.  Altogether, eight different riddles of the twenty have fallen.

    Reminder:  Pay close attention to the wording -- in most cases it has been carefully chosen.

    Below is the Rogue Riddle text with a minor correction to #19 -- thanks to Cyn for having pointed out the error.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

Rogue Riddle 1001

Yet Another Potpourri

 

    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:

 

·      Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

·      The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

 

·      Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

 

Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 

Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

·      Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

 

    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

 

2.  The determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

 

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?.

 

12.  The mine has played out?

 

13.  A bounding coast?

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   

 

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.

 

    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!

 

    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Have fun!



On Sat, Dec 7, 2019 at 12:30 PM Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...> wrote:
All,

    CynMac and One Sagan are first out of the blocks, nailing six different riddles (four for Cyn, two for One Sagan) within the first 25 minutes. Well done!

    The Rogue Riddle has been repeated below, and includes some minor typographic corrections and some punctuation corrections which may help.

    I will be away from the computer for several hours, but will check in periodically from my iPhone and answer as I can.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

All,
 
   We are off with the momentous and palindromic first of the next thousand.
 
Rogue Riddle 1001
Yet Another Potpourri
 
    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.
 
    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:
 

  • Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

  • The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

 

  • Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

 
Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 
Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.
 

  • Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

 
    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.
 
    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

 

2.  The determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

 

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?.

 

12.  The mine has played out?

 

13.  A bounding coast?

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom’s and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   
 
    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.
 
    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!
 
    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:
 
parkersan2001@...
 
    Have fun!

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1001 - Yet Another Potpourri -- Status Correction

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    Correction:  CynMac has five kills and One Sagan has two.  Seven riddles have been solved right off the bat.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================



On Sat, Dec 7, 2019 at 12:30 PM Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...> wrote:
All,

    CynMac and One Sagan are first out of the blocks, nailing six different riddles (four for Cyn, two for One Sagan) within the first 25 minutes. Well done!

    The Rogue Riddle has been repeated below, and includes some minor typographic corrections and some punctuation corrections which may help.

    I will be away from the computer for several hours, but will check in periodically from my iPhone and answer as I can.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

All,
 
   We are off with the momentous and palindromic first of the next thousand.
 
Rogue Riddle 1001
Yet Another Potpourri
 
    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.
 
    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:
 

  • Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

  • The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

 

  • Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

 
Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 
Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.
 

  • Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

 
    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.
 
    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

 

2.  The determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

 

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?.

 

12.  The mine has played out?

 

13.  A bounding coast?

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom’s and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   
 
    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.
 
    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!
 
    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:
 
parkersan2001@...
 
    Have fun!

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Re: Rogue Riddle 1001 - Yet Another Potpourri

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    CynMac and One Sagan are first out of the blocks, nailing six different riddles (four for Cyn, two for One Sagan) within the first 25 minutes. Well done!

    The Rogue Riddle has been repeated below, and includes some minor typographic corrections and some punctuation corrections which may help.

    I will be away from the computer for several hours, but will check in periodically from my iPhone and answer as I can.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

All,
 
   We are off with the momentous and palindromic first of the next thousand.
 
Rogue Riddle 1001
Yet Another Potpourri
 
    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.
 
    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:
 

  • Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

  • The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

 

  • Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

 
Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 
Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.
 

  • Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

 
    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.
 
    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

 

2.  The determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master and others in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would, “BLANK.”

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

 

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?.

 

12.  The mine has played out?

 

13.  A bounding coast?

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  One is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom’s and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   
 
    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.
 
    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!
 
    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:
 
parkersan2001@...
 
    Have fun!

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Re: lettuce alone

doug
 

My wife misses Romaine lettuce so much that's she's starting to have dreams where she "Sees-her" Salads again

I was right in the middle of making a salad when I first heard about the diseased Romaine, so I decided to toss it.

Doug S.
==============
Once Romaine is deemed safe again,we can spinach and every day enjoying a Caesar Salad without fear.

Doug S.
=========
Depart mint is what airlines give you before a flight.

Fly light is what fireflies  have in their tails.

GR
=============



I think the USDA should fire whoever's the head of lettuce Department

Doug S.
============

According to the CDC, lettuce diseases could increase in 2020 and what we're experiencing now is just the tip of the iceberg

Doug Spector
.
============

I couldn’t resist adding a haiku ...

West coast clergy were 
Asked to bless new Romaine crop;
“Dear Lord, lettuce spray ... “

CG

On Nov 29, 2019, at 11:21 AM, Cynthia MacGregor <cynthia@...> wrote:


Let’s pin each of you down so there are no mishaps.
Cyn
 
You guys kale me! Just don't climb up the cliff endive!
 
(Erika forgot to sign her name)
 
The news about the e.coli has leeked out, but there is safe lettuce growing up the mountain if you would scale yon cliff to reach it. The stores are charging raddichio-lous prices for produce but come and put your best Bibb on and have a meal with me.
 
Cyn
 
 
To mato or not to mato; that is the question. I have tossed about pondering it, but I am not concerned about a dressing down if I get it wrong.
 
Here I am One Sagan
 
 
On Friday, November 29, 2019, 03:55:29 PM UTC, gary hallock <gary@...> wrote:
 
 
Whether or not giving up lettuce will allow you to get a head still Romaines to be seen. There is not a lot of salad evidence.
 
Gary Hallock
 
=================
 
Hope everyone heard about the E.coli outbreak and threw away any Romaine lettuce...unless you're wanting a Seizure Salad
 
Doug Spector
 

--
Doug Spector

--
Doug Spector

--
Doug Spector
--
Doug Spector
--
Doug Spector


Rogue Riddle 1001 - Yet Another Potpourri

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

   We are off with the momentous and palindromic first of the next thousand.

 

Rogue Riddle 1001

Yet Another Potpourri

 

    As we embark on the next thousand Rogue Riddles, it seemed appropriate to offer yet another potpourri comprised of examples of the various sorts of riddles which have been used in the past.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  In each case the word “BLANK” is used simply as a placeholder – it does not necessarily indicate the number of words involved in the answer. There are four sections of riddles, with a hint at the beginning of each section:

 

  • Plays on timeless words and phrases (mostly the latter).  Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

  • The Bard as inspiration – limericks.  The challenge is to complete the last line of each limerick.  The meter and rhyme scheme of the limerick is very useful, and most limericks contain information in the first four lines which should help. 

 

  • Stately themes – straight puns on a theme.  For instance (using a different theme):

 

Q:  Robert E’s king?

A:  LEE’S MAJESTY (lese majesty or majesté)

 

Full credit for these requires both the punned and unpunned answers.

 

  • Spoonerisms – Usually, but not always, beginning, “What is the difference between . . . .”  The most famous example comes from the Reverend Spooner himself – “It’s beery work talking to empty wenches,” instead of “It’s weary work talking to empty benches.”

 

    As always, remember that the wording of each riddle generally has been carefully chosen both to provide clues and to avoid the use of any words in the answer.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1002 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Plays on timeless words and phrases:

 

1. A Dane strongly advised his sister to join PUNY and to attend the Pun-Off, saying BLANK.

 

2.  The determined Venetian dentist exclaimed, “BLANK.”

 

3.  As you like it, the Pun-Off is most enjoyable, having a surfeit not of luggage but of BLANK.

 

4.  The merry wife’s merriment was so contagious that even her husband’s cattle caught the humor.  Indeed, they definitely became the BLANK of the town.

 

5.  The goats loved to ram their master in the kiester.  And he hated it!  He went to a farm seeking to replace his herd, however he demanded goats that would BLANK.

 

The Bard as inspiration:

 

6.

The milkmaid steadied her pail

But her efforts did little avail.

Astern of the cow

‘Twas struck and how – 

For BLANK

 

7.

The steak in Venice was fresh,

But flavors needed to mesh.

To soften the meat,

It really was beat – 

‘Twas truly a BLANK

 

8.

The highest tech, you see,

Was attending to my PC.

He clearly explained

He’s specially trained –

But he’s just a BLANK.

 

9.

A giant beset, he’s bonkers

Tiny woman is swatting his honker.

No matter his try

His slaps are too high –

He finally BLANK.

 

10.

With a leer he hits the deck running

With paronomasiac cunning.

But responses in kind

Drove quips from his mind –

He’s BLANK.

 

 

Stately themes?

 

11.  I shall inquire of my friend?.

 

12.  The mine has played out?

 

13.  A bounding coast?

 

14.  That boy will get on everyone’s nerves?

 

15.  A happy place, full of mirth?

 

Spoonerisms:

 

16.  What is the difference between a gym changing area and those who jeer at wearers of glasses?  One is BLANK while the others are BLANK.

 

17.  What is the difference between an honor a mayor may confer and the task of taking care of antes and bets?  On is the BLANK, and for the other one must BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between Lange getting clean and a German philosopher?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

 

19.  What is the difference between a newsroom’s and Labour?  One seeks BLANK while the other seeks to BLANK.

 

20.  It seems celebration and merriment increases markedly as BLANK BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    These riddles are a bit more demanding than usual, but not unsolvable.   

 

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host.

 

    The purpose here is just to have fun, so wade in!

 

    Please remember, do not hit REPLY, but instead address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Have fun!


    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1001 - Another Potpourri

Lars Hanson
 

All,

With a full thousand Rogue Riddles behind us, the first riddle set of the next thousand will be out before noon (EST) today. It will be a potpourri of the types of riddles used in the first thousand.

Aloha,

Lars
======================


Re: PUNY MissElainey Subgroup? (was: PUNY FAQs)

Lee Jackson
 

Well, folks, it's after midnight CST, and I haven't received a single nay vote, nor have I received a single alternate name suggestion (except for Gary's Missle Anus, but that'd be too big of a pain in the ass to implement). Therefore, I'm going to go ahead with the original idea of setting up a subgroup for both non-punny/pun-related word discussion and for O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships discussions, and, I'm going to stick with the original name idea of MissElainey as the subgroup name.

I will work on setting this up over the weekend. You'll get an Administrivia post once it's done. Thank you for participating!

On 12/6/2019 6:08 PM, JANET MUNRO wrote:
Yea.

I’m away from home at the moment, without a laptop (which is back home in the laptop hospital, having had a hard drive organ donation made to it), so I’ve been reading emails on my iPhone and iPad. Certainly possible, but sometimes awkward when having to scroll through emails that have several replies that have long tails (and tales within tails).

And Yea on the name.

Janet Munro


On Dec 7, 2019, at 1:42 AM, LILA BONDY <lila1150@...> wrote:

A yea to 1 and 2.  Looking forward to a great subgroup!

Lila Bondy





On December 5, 2019 at 1:53 PM gary hallock <gary@...> wrote:

Yeah, sure whatevs!  Okay, bummer!

PUNY-Missle anus would probably not appeal to most. 

Gary

 

On Dec 5, 2019, at 12:39 PM, Cynthia MacGregor <Cynthia@...> wrote:

Yea to items 1 and 2

 

Make it a splendiferous day!

 

Cynthia ("Cyn") MacGregor

Freelance writer/editor

 

Pass a smile along

 

From: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io> on behalf of Lee Jackson <leejackson@...>
Reply-To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 12:50 PM
To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Subject: [puny] PUNY MissElainey Subgroup? (was: PUNY FAQs)

 

I've done some thinking, as promised, and I think that perhaps we could use a new subgroup. This subgroup would be an amalgamation of the old Pun-Amok and Punoff Yahoo groups, designed for any non-PUNY/punny discussion. It would host both "chatter about things related to language, grammar and a variety of historical and cultural discussions that often cropped up as a result of a punning thread," as Gary said Pun-Amok once did, and it would simultaneously host any discussions related to the annual O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships and its ancillary events. I foresee that the volume would be small enough that it could easily handle both topics of conversation without much stepping on peoples' toes.

That's item one of this e-mail: do you agree with my proposal? Please respond yea or nay.

Item two is more trivial, but equally necessary. If item one passes, and I am going to be presumptuous and say that it will, the new subgroup will need a name. My first suggestion is PUNY-MissElainey. This is an open item: feel free to throw out ideas, but (for now) only if you respond with a yea to item one of this e-mail. (We'll open it up to everyone if item one passes.)

Please respond promptly. Thank you for your time.

--
Lee Jackson, PUNY group Administrangler
Visit the PUNY and O. Henry Museum Web Sites!
http://punpunpun.com
http://www.austintexas.gov/department/o-henry-museum
https://www.facebook.com/groups/punoff/

 



--
Gary (Immodest Moderator) Hallock, Leerless Feeder

 


Re: PUNY MissElainey Subgroup? (was: PUNY FAQs)

JANET MUNRO <serepeins3@...>
 

Yea.

I’m away from home at the moment, without a laptop (which is back home in the laptop hospital, having had a hard drive organ donation made to it), so I’ve been reading emails on my iPhone and iPad. Certainly possible, but sometimes awkward when having to scroll through emails that have several replies that have long tails (and tales within tails).

And Yea on the name.

Janet Munro


On Dec 7, 2019, at 1:42 AM, LILA BONDY <lila1150@...> wrote:

A yea to 1 and 2.  Looking forward to a great subgroup!

Lila Bondy





On December 5, 2019 at 1:53 PM gary hallock <gary@...> wrote:

Yeah, sure whatevs!  Okay, bummer!

PUNY-Missle anus would probably not appeal to most. 

Gary

 

On Dec 5, 2019, at 12:39 PM, Cynthia MacGregor <Cynthia@...> wrote:

Yea to items 1 and 2

 

Make it a splendiferous day!

 

Cynthia ("Cyn") MacGregor

Freelance writer/editor

 

Pass a smile along

 

From: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io> on behalf of Lee Jackson <leejackson@...>
Reply-To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 12:50 PM
To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Subject: [puny] PUNY MissElainey Subgroup? (was: PUNY FAQs)

 

I've done some thinking, as promised, and I think that perhaps we could use a new subgroup. This subgroup would be an amalgamation of the old Pun-Amok and Punoff Yahoo groups, designed for any non-PUNY/punny discussion. It would host both "chatter about things related to language, grammar and a variety of historical and cultural discussions that often cropped up as a result of a punning thread," as Gary said Pun-Amok once did, and it would simultaneously host any discussions related to the annual O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships and its ancillary events. I foresee that the volume would be small enough that it could easily handle both topics of conversation without much stepping on peoples' toes.

That's item one of this e-mail: do you agree with my proposal? Please respond yea or nay.

Item two is more trivial, but equally necessary. If item one passes, and I am going to be presumptuous and say that it will, the new subgroup will need a name. My first suggestion is PUNY-MissElainey. This is an open item: feel free to throw out ideas, but (for now) only if you respond with a yea to item one of this e-mail. (We'll open it up to everyone if item one passes.)

Please respond promptly. Thank you for your time.

--
Lee Jackson, PUNY group Administrangler
Visit the PUNY and O. Henry Museum Web Sites!
http://punpunpun.com
http://www.austintexas.gov/department/o-henry-museum
https://www.facebook.com/groups/punoff/

 



--
Gary (Immodest Moderator) Hallock, Leerless Feeder

 


Re: PUNY MissElainey Subgroup? (was: PUNY FAQs)

LILA BONDY
 

A yea to 1 and 2.  Looking forward to a great subgroup!

Lila Bondy





On December 5, 2019 at 1:53 PM gary hallock <gary@...> wrote:

Yeah, sure whatevs!  Okay, bummer!

PUNY-Missle anus would probably not appeal to most. 

Gary

 

On Dec 5, 2019, at 12:39 PM, Cynthia MacGregor <Cynthia@...> wrote:

Yea to items 1 and 2

 

Make it a splendiferous day!

 

Cynthia ("Cyn") MacGregor

Freelance writer/editor

www.cynthiamacgregor.com

 

Pass a smile along

 

From: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io> on behalf of Lee Jackson <leejackson@...>
Reply-To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 12:50 PM
To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Subject: [puny] PUNY MissElainey Subgroup? (was: PUNY FAQs)

 

I've done some thinking, as promised, and I think that perhaps we could use a new subgroup. This subgroup would be an amalgamation of the old Pun-Amok and Punoff Yahoo groups, designed for any non-PUNY/punny discussion. It would host both "chatter about things related to language, grammar and a variety of historical and cultural discussions that often cropped up as a result of a punning thread," as Gary said Pun-Amok once did, and it would simultaneously host any discussions related to the annual O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships and its ancillary events. I foresee that the volume would be small enough that it could easily handle both topics of conversation without much stepping on peoples' toes.

That's item one of this e-mail: do you agree with my proposal? Please respond yea or nay.

Item two is more trivial, but equally necessary. If item one passes, and I am going to be presumptuous and say that it will, the new subgroup will need a name. My first suggestion is PUNY-MissElainey. This is an open item: feel free to throw out ideas, but (for now) only if you respond with a yea to item one of this e-mail. (We'll open it up to everyone if item one passes.)

Please respond promptly. Thank you for your time.

--
Lee Jackson, PUNY group Administrangler
Visit the PUNY and O. Henry Museum Web Sites!
http://punpunpun.com
http://www.austintexas.gov/department/o-henry-museum
https://www.facebook.com/groups/punoff/

 



--
Gary (Immodest Moderator) Hallock, Leerless Feeder

 


Found On Amazon

Lee Jackson
 


Re: PUNY MissElainey Subgroup? (was: PUNY FAQs)

Lee Jackson
 

I'm seeing enough yeas on #1 to convince me that a new subgroup is needed, and enough agreement with #2 that I'm probably going to name it MissElainey ("Want to discuss that further? Go talk to MissElainey.") However, I'm going to leave the voting open for the rest of today and throw the name suggestions wide open, again until midnight CST.

As Administrangler, I ultimately hold the power of the keystroke, but I am gladly willing to be persuaded if someone comes up with just the right name for the new subgroup. Please do your absolute best.

On 12/5/2019 7:07 PM, Lars Hanson wrote:
Lee,

    Yes on one.

    While I am not a particular fan of #2 in general (   ;-)    ), MissElainey sounds good to me.  :-D

    Aloha,

        Lars


======================


On Dec 5, 2019, at 14:53, gary hallock <gary@...> wrote:

 Yeah, sure whatevs!  Okay, bummer!

PUNY-Missle anus would probably not appeal to most. 

Gary


On Dec 5, 2019, at 12:39 PM, Cynthia MacGregor <Cynthia@...> wrote:



Yea to items 1 and 2

 

Make it a splendiferous day!

 

Cynthia ("Cyn") MacGregor

Freelance writer/editor

 

Pass a smile along

 

From: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io> on behalf of Lee Jackson <leejackson@...>
Reply-To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 12:50 PM
To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Subject: [puny] PUNY MissElainey Subgroup? (was: PUNY FAQs)

 

I've done some thinking, as promised, and I think that perhaps we could use a new subgroup. This subgroup would be an amalgamation of the old Pun-Amok and Punoff Yahoo groups, designed for any non-PUNY/punny discussion. It would host both "chatter about things related to language, grammar and a variety of historical and cultural discussions that often cropped up as a result of a punning thread," as Gary said Pun-Amok once did, and it would simultaneously host any discussions related to the annual O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships and its ancillary events. I foresee that the volume would be small enough that it could easily handle both topics of conversation without much stepping on peoples' toes.

That's item one of this e-mail: do you agree with my proposal? Please respond yea or nay.

Item two is more trivial, but equally necessary. If item one passes, and I am going to be presumptuous and say that it will, the new subgroup will need a name. My first suggestion is PUNY-MissElainey. This is an open item: feel free to throw out ideas, but (for now) only if you respond with a yea to item one of this e-mail. (We'll open it up to everyone if item one passes.)

Please respond promptly. Thank you for your time.

--
Lee Jackson, PUNY group Administrangler
Visit the PUNY and O. Henry Museum Web Sites!
http://punpunpun.com
http://www.austintexas.gov/department/o-henry-museum
https://www.facebook.com/groups/punoff/


--
Gary (Immodest Moderator) Hallock, Leerless Feeder