Date   

Riddle 1019 Warning

Kirk Miller
 

Riddle 1019 should launch Saturday, April 11, between 7:00 and 9:00 a.m. Central Time.

       
Kirk Miller
Don't settle for the world as it is.  Work for the world as it should be.


Cheers or Tears?

doug
 

corona beer.jpg

--
Doug Spector


Rogue Riddle 1018 - Doubles - Winner Declared and Answers Revealed

Lars Hanson
 



All,

 

    Gary Hallock joined the hunt late, but Kirk took an early lead and never looked back, and so Kirk will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.  

 

    The answers to this week’s Rogue Riddle are revealed below.  As noted, each pair of answers start with successive letters of the alphabet.  Riddle 1 begins with A, riddle 2 with B, riddle 3 with C, and so on.

 

   Needless to say, making this work required using some strange words in three riddles at the end.  Even so, at least 23 of the riddles were in fact straightforward.  As for the others, a search of the dictionary entries for X, Y, and Z are short.  A quick search might well have revealed these answers.  

 

  Riddle stats (2 players):

2 correct - 7:    1-3, 13, 21-23

1 correct - 9:  5, 7-9, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19

½ correct – 1:  26  (Everyone got ZEBRA)

0 correct – 10:  4, 6, 10, 12, 16, 17, 20, 24, 25  

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile ACROBAT swung at them with A CROW BAT.

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BATTLE MINTS thrown down from the BATTLEMENTS.

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether CAT A-GORY might be a new CATEGORY of horror film.

 

4.  With results DIS SMALL, the chances for success appear DISMAL.

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he ET A BULL instead and found it quite EDIBLE.

 

6.  When so FEW TILL, farming becomes FUTILE.

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s GOLF FOR," the GOLFER wondered.

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one HAM PER HAMPER.

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad INSTEP, it is difficult to march IN STEP.

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a JEW FISH for JEWFISH.

        A jewfish is a kind of grouper.)

 

11.  Among the KURDISH, company generally will be offered a KURD DISH at dinner.

        (I gave one player credit for “curd” dish, even though not quite correct.)

 

12.  The diver’s LAMP RAY revealed a LAMPREY.

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this MEDIC CULL will result in shortages of MEDICAL personnel.

 

14.  It is the mesh, the NETWORK, with makes the NET WORK.

 

15.  Was that ORATORY delivered by Labour OR A TORY.

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will PERFORM PER FORM on any given night.

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the QUARTERS STAFF would block entrance with a QUARTERSTAFF.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to RELENT and RE-LENT his nephew money.

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle SAM PULL a SAMPLE for evaluation.

 

20.  Before one elects to TEACH A BULL, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact TEACHABLE.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate an UMP in an UMP PYRE.

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The VERTI-BRA will keep your VERTEBRA aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not WITH HER she would WITHER.

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to XE BECK and call of the XEBEC.

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his YATAGHAN YET AGAIN.

         A yataghan is a double-curved Turkish sword, like a scimitar.

 

26.  The North African natives drove a ZEBRA into their ZAREBA.

        A zareba is an enclosure made of bushes or stakes.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    Thanks to Kirk and Gary for playing.

 

    Kirk will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

   Take it away, Kirk!

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Virus--Pass By Us

doug
 

Until now, we have never known a Virus as evil as Corona. But soon we'll contain This horrible strain Forever to leave us alona! --Doug Spector



--
Doug Spector


Rogue Riddle 1018 - Doubles - Status 10 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Gary Hallock joined the hunt on the wee small hours this morning with an admirable opening shot, but Kirk remains in the lead.  Anyone else?

 

Hints:

 

·      Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY, nor are any words in the answer to a riddle included in the set-up for that riddle.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of the answers.

 

·      There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

 

·      Why might there be 26 riddles this week?  Does the number 26 ring a bell?

 

·      Pay close attention to the wording of each set-up.  As usual, that wording had been chosen to provide clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  The letter counts for the first five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #2:  The letter counts for the second five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #3:  The letter counts for the third five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #4:  The letter counts for the next five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #5:  

 

·      The letter counts for the last six riddles are given below.

 

·      Clues for riddles 4, 5, 20, 24, 25, and 26 are provided as well

 

Clue Set #6:  

 

·      Initial letters for each answer – There are 26 letters in the alphabet.  The initial letters for each answer are the letters of the alphabet, in order.

 

·      Clues for riddles 6, 11, 15, 17, and 22 are provided as well.

 

Clue Set #7:   Clues for riddles 7, 10, and 12 are provided below.

 

 

    There must be some new players out there as well as the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

      (7 / 1, 4, 3)

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

       (6, 5 / 11)

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

       (3, 1-4 / 8)

 

4.  With results BLANK, the chances for success appear BLANK.

     (3, 5 / 6)

      Were they larger, things might appear more optimistic.

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

      (2, 1, 4 / 6)

      A very hungry person might claim to be so hungry he could . . . .

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

      (3, 4 / 6)

      What do farmers do to prepare their fields?

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

      (4, 3 / 6)

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 6)

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

      (6 / 2, 4)

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

        (3, 4 / 7)

        What would one do offshore?  Who would be doing it?

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.
         (7 / 4, 4)

        In people in northeastern Iraq and southeastern Turkey, for instance.

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 7)

        Imagine the diver under water at night.

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

         (5, 4 / 7)

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

        (7 / 3, 4)

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labour BLANK.

        (7 / 2, 1, 4)

        If one is not Labour, then one is a . . . .

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

         (7 / 3, 4)

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

         (8, 5 / 12)

         That which was being used to block the entrance was held in the hands.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

        (6 / 2-4)

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

         (3, 4 / 6)

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

         (5, 1, 4 / 9)

         The answer here is instructive.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

         (6 / 3, 4)

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

         (5-3 / 8)

         Uplifting undergarments.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 6)

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

         (2, 4 / 5)

         Not a felucca, but a  . . . .

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

         (8 / 3, 5)

         What sort of thing might a warrior draw?

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

        (5 / 6)

        The second BLANK might be of bushes or wood.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1018 - Doubles - Status 9 and Clue Set 7 - #Rogue Riddle #rogue

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Kirk continue to plug away at this week's rogue riddle.  This set of clues should open the thinking for at least some of you.  In order to give everyone a bit more of a chance, I am extending this week’s riddle one more day, until tomorrow, Wednesday.

 

Hints:

 

·      Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY, nor are any words in the answer to a riddle included in the set-up for that riddle.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of the answers.

 

·      There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

 

·      Why might there be 26 riddles this week?  Does the number 26 ring a bell?

 

·      Pay close attention to the wording of each set-up.  As usual, that wording had been chosen to provide clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  The letter counts for the first five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #2:  The letter counts for the second five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #3:  The letter counts for the third five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #4:  The letter counts for the next five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #5:  

 

·      The letter counts for the last six riddles are given below.

 

·      Clues for riddles 4, 5, 20, 24, 25, and 26 are provided as well

 

Clue Set #6:  

 

·      Initial letters for each answer – There are 26 letters in the alphabet.  The initial letters for each answer are the letters of the alphabet, in order.

 

·      Clues for riddles 6, 11, 15, 17, and 22 are provided as well.

 

Clue Set #7:   Clues for riddles 7, 10, and 12 are provided below.

 

    There must be some new players out there as well as the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

      (7 / 1, 4, 3)

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

       (6, 5 / 11)

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

       (3, 1-4 / 8)

 

4.  With results BLANK, the chances for success appear BLANK.

     (3, 5 / 6)

      Were they larger, things might appear more optimistic.

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

      (2, 1, 4 / 6)

      A very hungry person might claim to be so hungry he could . . . .

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

      (3, 4 / 6)

      What do farmers do to prepare their fields?

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

      (4, 3 / 6)

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 6)

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

      (6 / 2, 4)

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

        (3, 4 / 7)

        What would one do offshore?  Who would be doing it?

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.
         (7 / 4, 4)

        In people in northeastern Iraq and southeastern Turkey, for instance.

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 7)

        Imagine the diver under water at night.

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

         (5, 4 / 7)

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

        (7 / 3, 4)

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labour BLANK.

        (7 / 2, 1, 4)

        If one is not Labour, then one is a . . . .

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

         (7 / 3, 4)

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

         (8, 5 / 12)

         That which was being used to block the entrance was held in the hands.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

        (6 / 2-4)

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

         (3, 4 / 6)

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

         (5, 1, 4 / 9)

         The answer here is instructive.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

         (6 / 3, 4)

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

         (5-3 / 8)

         Uplifting undergarments.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 6)

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

         (2, 4 / 5)

         Not a felucca, but a  . . . .

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

         (8 / 3, 5)

         What sort of thing might a warrior draw?

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

        (5 / 6)

        The second BLANK might be of bushes or wood.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Re: The Emperor Has No Clothes

Marilyn Van Driesen
 

That is so funny!

On Tuesday, April 7, 2020, 08:16:00 AM CDT, Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...> wrote:


Merk,

    My reply to your off-line note has been rejected by your server.

    Aloha,

        Lars

======================


Rogue Riddle 1018 -- Doubles - Status 8 and Clue Set 6 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Still just one player.  Is everyone but Kirk stumped this week?  This set of clues should pen the thinking for at least some of you.  In order to give everyone a bit more of a chance, I am extending this week’s riddle one more day, until tomorrow, Wednesday.

 

Hints:

 

·      Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY, nor are any words in the answer to a riddle included in the set-up for that riddle.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of the answers.

 

·      There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

 

·      Why might there be 26 riddles this week?  Does the number 26 ring a bell?

 

·      Pay close attention to the wording of each set-up.  As usual, that wording had been chosen to provide clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  The letter counts for the first five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #2:  The letter counts for the second five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #3:  The letter counts for the third five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #4:  The letter counts for the next five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #5:  

 

·      The letter counts for the last six riddles are given below.

 

·      Clues for riddles 4, 5, 20, 24, 25, and 26 are provided as well

 

Clue Set #6:  

 

·      Initial letters for each answer – There are 26 letters in the alphabet.  The initial letters for each answer are the letters of the alphabet, in order.

 

·      Clues for riddles 6, 11, 15, 17, and 22 are provided as well.

 

    There must be some new players out there as well as the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

      (7 / 1, 4, 3)

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

       (6, 5 / 11)

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

       (3, 1-4 / 8)

 

4.  With results BLANK, the chances for success appear BLANK.

     (3, 5 / 6)

      Were they larger, things might appear more optimistic.

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

      (2, 1, 4 / 6)

      A very hungry person might claim to be so hungry he could . . . .

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

      (3, 4 / 6)

      What do farmers do to prepare their fields?

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

      (4, 3 / 6)

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 6)

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

      (6 / 2, 4)

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

        (3, 4 / 7)

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.
         (7 / 4, 4)

        In northeastern Iraq and southeastern Turkey, for instance.

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 7)

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

         (5, 4 / 7)

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

        (7 / 3, 4)

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labour BLANK.

        (7 / 2, 1, 4)

        If one is not Labour, then one is a . . . .

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

         (7 / 3, 4)

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

         (8, 5 / 12)

         That which was being used to block the entrance was held in the hands.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

        (6 / 2-4)

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

         (3, 4 / 6)

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

         (5, 1, 4 / 9)

         The answer here is instructive.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

         (6 / 3, 4)

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

         (5-3 / 8)

         Uplifting undergarments.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 6)

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

         (2, 4 / 5)

         Not a felucca . . . .

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

         (8 / 3, 5)

         What sort of thing might a warrior draw?

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

        (5 / 6)

        The second BLANK might be of bushes or wood.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Re: The Emperor Has No Clothes

Lars Hanson
 

Merk,

    My reply to your off-line note has been rejected by your server.

    Aloha,

        Lars

======================


Re: The Emperor Has No Clothes

Marilyn Van Driesen
 

Oh, my word, there are people I'd love to share this with, but they'd have a coronary.

Merk

On Monday, April 6, 2020, 05:53:05 PM CDT, Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...> wrote:


All

    Jennifer Senior, in her op-ed piece in this morning's New York Times, probably lays the situation out as plainly as anyone I have seen to date.

    Thoughts?  Reactions?

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

 

This Is What Happens When a Narcissist Runs a Crisis

Trump’s catastrophic performance has as much to do with psychology as ideology.

By Jennifer Senior                             

Opinion columnist

April 5, 2020


Since the early days of the Trump administration, an impassioned group of mental health professionals have warned the public about the president’s cramped and disordered mind, a darkened attic of fluttering bats. Their assessments have been controversial. The American Psychiatric Association’s code of ethics expressly forbids its members from diagnosing a public figure from afar.

Enough is enough. As I’ve argued before, an in-person analysis of Donald J. Trump would not reveal any hidden depths — his internal sonar could barely fathom the bottom of a sink — and these are exceptional, urgent times. Back in October, George T. Conway III, the conservative lawyer and husband of Kellyanne, wrote a long, devastating essay for The Atlantic, noting that Trump has all the hallmarks of narcissistic personality disorder. That disorder was dangerous enough during times of prosperity, jeopardizing the moral and institutional foundations of our country.

But now we’re in the midst of a global pandemic. The president’s pathology is endangering not just institutions, but lives.

Let’s start with the basics. First: Narcissistic personalities like Trump harbor skyscraping delusions about their own capabilities. They exaggerate their accomplishments, focus obsessively on projecting power, and wish desperately to win.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump says we’ve got plenty of tests available, when we don’t. He declares that Google is building a comprehensive drive-thru testing website, when it isn’t. He sends a Navy hospital ship to New York and it proves little more than an excuse for a campaign commercial, arriving and sitting almost empty in the Hudson. A New York hospital executive calls it a joke.

Second: The grandiosity of narcissistic personalities belies an extreme fragility, their egos as delicate as foam. They live in terror of being upstaged. They’re too thin skinned to be told they’re wrong.

What that means, during this pandemic: Narcissistic leaders never have, as Trump likes to say, the best people. They have galleries of sycophants. With the exceptions of Drs. Anthony Fauci and Deborah Birx, Trump has surrounded himself with a Z-team of dangerously inexperienced toadies and flunkies — the bargain-bin rejects from Filene’s Basement — at a time when we require the brightest and most imaginative minds in the country.

Faced with a historic public health crisis, Trump could have assembled a first-rate company of disaster preparedness experts. Instead he gave the job to his son-in-law, a man-child of breathtaking vapidity. Faced with a historic economic crisis, Trump could have assembled a team of Nobel-prize winning economists or previous treasury secretaries. Instead he talks to Larry Kudlow, a former CNBC host.

Meanwhile, Fauci and Birx measure every word they say like old-time apothecaries, hoping not to humiliate the narcissist — neverhumiliate a narcissist — while discreetly correcting his false hopes and falsehoods. They are desperately attempting to create a safe space for our president, when the president should be creating a safer nation for all of us.

Third: Narcissistic personalities love nothing more than engineering conflict and sowing division. It destabilizes everyone, keeps them in control.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is pitting state against state for precious resources, rather than coordinating a national response. (“It’s like being on eBay,” complained Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York last week.) His White House is a petty palace of competing power centers. He picks fights with Democratic officials and members of the press, when all the public craves is comfort.

Narcissistic personalities don’t do comfort. They cannot fathom the needs of other hearts.

Fourth: Narcissistic personalities are vindictive. On a clear day, you can see their grudges forever.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is playing favorites with governors who praise him and punishing those who fail to give him the respect he believes he deserves. “If they don’t treat you right, don’t call,” he told Vice President Mike Pence.

His grudge match with New York is now especially lethal. When asked on Friday whether New York will have enough ventilators, Trump bluntly answered “No,” and then blamed the state.

And most relevant, as far as history is concerned: Narcissistic personalities are weak.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is genuinely afraid to lead. He can’t bring himself to make robust use of the Defense Production Act, because the buck would stop with him. (To this day, he insists states should be acquiring their own ventilators.) When asked about delays in testing, he said, “I don’t take responsibility at all.” During Friday’s news conference, he added the tests “we inherited were “broken, were obsolete,” when this form of coronavirus didn’t even exist under his predecessor.

This sounds an awful lot like one of the three sentences that Homer Simpson swears will get you through life: “It was like that when I got here.”

Most people, even the most hotheaded and difficult ones, have enough space in their souls to set aside their anger in times of crisis. Think of Rudolph Giuliani during Sept. 11. Think of Andrew Cuomo now.

But every aspect of Trump’s crisis management has been annexed by his psychopathology. As Americans die, he boasts about his television ratings. As Americans die, he crows that he’s No. 1 on Facebook, which isn’t close to true.

But it is true that all eyes are on him. He’s got a captive audience, an attention-addict’s dream come to life. It’s just that he, like all narcissistic personalities, has no clue how disgracefully — how shamefully, how deplorably — he’ll be enshrined in memory.

Jennifer Senior has been an Op-Ed columnist since September 2018. She had been a daily book critic for The Times; before that, she spent many years as a staff writer for New York magazine. Her best-selling book, "All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood," has been translated into 12 languages.

A version of this article appears in print on April 6, 2020, Section A, Page 23 of the New York edition with the headline: Trump’s Narcissism Could Cost Us Our Lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                


Rogue Riddle 1018 - Doubles - Status 7 and Clue Set 5 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Still no activity.  Is everyone but Kirk stumped this week?  Kirk still remains the only player.  Where is everyone?

 

Hints:

 

·      Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY, nor are any words in the answer to a riddle included in the set-up for that riddle.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of the answers.

 

·      There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

 

·      Why might there be 26 riddles this week?  Does the number 26 ring a bell?

 

Clue Set #1:  The letter counts for the first five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #2:  The letter counts for the second five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #3:  The letter counts for the third five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #4:  The letter counts for the next five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #5:  

 

·      The letter counts for the last six riddles are given below.

 

·      Clues for riddles 4, 5, 20, 24, 25, and 26 are provided as well

 

    There must be some new players out there as well as the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

      (7 / 1, 4, 3)

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

       (6, 5 / 11)

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

       (3, 1-4 / 8)

 

4.  With results BLANK, the chances for success appear BLANK.

     (3, 5 / 6)

      Were they larger, things might appear more optimistic.

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

      (2, 1, 4 / 6)

      A very hungry person might claim to be so hungry he could . . . .

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

      (3, 4 / 6)

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

      (4, 3 / 6)

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 6)

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

      (6 / 2, 4)

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

        (3, 4 / 7)

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.
         (7 / 4, 4)

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 7)

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

         (5, 4 / 7)

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

        (7 / 3, 4)

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labor BLANK.

        (7 / 2, 1, 4)

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

         (7 / 3, 4)

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

         (8, 5 / 12)

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

        (6 / 2-4)

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

         (3, 4 / 6)

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

         (5, 1, 4 / 9)

         The answer here is instructive.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

         (6 / 3, 4)

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

         (5-3 / 8)

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 6)

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

         (2, 4 / 5)

         Not a felucca . . . .

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

         (8 / 3, 5)

         What sort of thing might a warrior draw?

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

        (5 / 6)

        The second BLANK might be of bushes or wood.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1018 -- Staes 6 & Clue Set 4 -- #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Still no activity.  Is everyone but Kirk stumped this week?  Kirk still remains the only player this week.  Where is everyone?

 

Hints:

 

=   Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY, nor are any words in the answer to a riddle included in the set-up for that riddle.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of the answers.

 

=   There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

 

=   Why might there be 26 riddles this week?  Does the number 26 ring a bell?

 

Clue Set #1:  The letter counts for the first five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #2:  The letter counts for the second five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #3:  The letter counts for the third five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #4:  The letter counts for the next five riddles are given below.

 

    There must be some new players out there as well ads the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

      (7 / 1, 4, 3)

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

       (6, 5 / 11)

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

       (3, 1-4 / 8)

 

4.  With results BLANK, the chances for success appear BLANK.

     (3, 5 / 6)

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

      (2, 1, 4 / 6)

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

      (3, 4 / 6)

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

      (4, 3 / 6)

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 6)

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

      (6 / 2, 4)

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

        (3, 4 / 7)

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.
         (7 / 4, 4)

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 7)

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

         (5, 4 / 7)

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

        (7 / 3, 4)

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labor BLANK.

        (7 / 2, 1, 4)

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

         (7 / 3, 4)

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

         (8, 5 / 12)

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

        (6 / 2-4)

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

         (3, 4 / 6)

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

         (5, 1, 4 / 9)

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Re: The Emperor Has No Clothes

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    My apologies to everyone.  The message below went to the wrong e-mail list.

    Please disregard.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================



On Mon, Apr 6, 2020 at 6:52 PM Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...> wrote:
All

    Jennifer Senior, in her op-ed piece in this morning's New York Times, probably lays the situation out as plainly as anyone I have seen to date.

    Thoughts?  Reactions?

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

 

This Is What Happens When a Narcissist Runs a Crisis

Trump’s catastrophic performance has as much to do with psychology as ideology.

By Jennifer Senior                             

Opinion columnist

April 5, 2020


Since the early days of the Trump administration, an impassioned group of mental health professionals have warned the public about the president’s cramped and disordered mind, a darkened attic of fluttering bats. Their assessments have been controversial. The American Psychiatric Association’s code of ethics expressly forbids its members from diagnosing a public figure from afar.

Enough is enough. As I’ve argued before, an in-person analysis of Donald J. Trump would not reveal any hidden depths — his internal sonar could barely fathom the bottom of a sink — and these are exceptional, urgent times. Back in October, George T. Conway III, the conservative lawyer and husband of Kellyanne, wrote a long, devastating essay for The Atlantic, noting that Trump has all the hallmarks of narcissistic personality disorder. That disorder was dangerous enough during times of prosperity, jeopardizing the moral and institutional foundations of our country.

But now we’re in the midst of a global pandemic. The president’s pathology is endangering not just institutions, but lives.

Let’s start with the basics. First: Narcissistic personalities like Trump harbor skyscraping delusions about their own capabilities. They exaggerate their accomplishments, focus obsessively on projecting power, and wish desperately to win.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump says we’ve got plenty of tests available, when we don’t. He declares that Google is building a comprehensive drive-thru testing website, when it isn’t. He sends a Navy hospital ship to New York and it proves little more than an excuse for a campaign commercial, arriving and sitting almost empty in the Hudson. A New York hospital executive calls it a joke.

Second: The grandiosity of narcissistic personalities belies an extreme fragility, their egos as delicate as foam. They live in terror of being upstaged. They’re too thin skinned to be told they’re wrong.

What that means, during this pandemic: Narcissistic leaders never have, as Trump likes to say, the best people. They have galleries of sycophants. With the exceptions of Drs. Anthony Fauci and Deborah Birx, Trump has surrounded himself with a Z-team of dangerously inexperienced toadies and flunkies — the bargain-bin rejects from Filene’s Basement — at a time when we require the brightest and most imaginative minds in the country.

Faced with a historic public health crisis, Trump could have assembled a first-rate company of disaster preparedness experts. Instead he gave the job to his son-in-law, a man-child of breathtaking vapidity. Faced with a historic economic crisis, Trump could have assembled a team of Nobel-prize winning economists or previous treasury secretaries. Instead he talks to Larry Kudlow, a former CNBC host.

Meanwhile, Fauci and Birx measure every word they say like old-time apothecaries, hoping not to humiliate the narcissist — neverhumiliate a narcissist — while discreetly correcting his false hopes and falsehoods. They are desperately attempting to create a safe space for our president, when the president should be creating a safer nation for all of us.

Third: Narcissistic personalities love nothing more than engineering conflict and sowing division. It destabilizes everyone, keeps them in control.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is pitting state against state for precious resources, rather than coordinating a national response. (“It’s like being on eBay,” complained Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York last week.) His White House is a petty palace of competing power centers. He picks fights with Democratic officials and members of the press, when all the public craves is comfort.

Narcissistic personalities don’t do comfort. They cannot fathom the needs of other hearts.

Fourth: Narcissistic personalities are vindictive. On a clear day, you can see their grudges forever.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is playing favorites with governors who praise him and punishing those who fail to give him the respect he believes he deserves. “If they don’t treat you right, don’t call,” he told Vice President Mike Pence.

His grudge match with New York is now especially lethal. When asked on Friday whether New York will have enough ventilators, Trump bluntly answered “No,” and then blamed the state.

And most relevant, as far as history is concerned: Narcissistic personalities are weak.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is genuinely afraid to lead. He can’t bring himself to make robust use of the Defense Production Act, because the buck would stop with him. (To this day, he insists states should be acquiring their own ventilators.) When asked about delays in testing, he said, “I don’t take responsibility at all.” During Friday’s news conference, he added the tests “we inherited were “broken, were obsolete,” when this form of coronavirus didn’t even exist under his predecessor.

This sounds an awful lot like one of the three sentences that Homer Simpson swears will get you through life: “It was like that when I got here.”

Most people, even the most hotheaded and difficult ones, have enough space in their souls to set aside their anger in times of crisis. Think of Rudolph Giuliani during Sept. 11. Think of Andrew Cuomo now.

But every aspect of Trump’s crisis management has been annexed by his psychopathology. As Americans die, he boasts about his television ratings. As Americans die, he crows that he’s No. 1 on Facebook, which isn’t close to true.

But it is true that all eyes are on him. He’s got a captive audience, an attention-addict’s dream come to life. It’s just that he, like all narcissistic personalities, has no clue how disgracefully — how shamefully, how deplorably — he’ll be enshrined in memory.

Jennifer Senior has been an Op-Ed columnist since September 2018. She had been a daily book critic for The Times; before that, she spent many years as a staff writer for New York magazine. Her best-selling book, "All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood," has been translated into 12 languages.

A version of this article appears in print on April 6, 2020, Section A, Page 23 of the New York edition with the headline: Trump’s Narcissism Could Cost Us Our Lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                


Re: The Emperor Has No Clothes

Cynthia MacGregor
 

did u mean to send this to PUNY?

 

Make it a splendiferous day!

 

Cynthia ("Cyn") MacGregor

Freelance writer/editor

www.cynthiamacgregor.com

 

Pass a smile along

 

From: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io> on behalf of Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...>
Reply-To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 6, 2020 at 6:52 PM
To: PUNY <main@puny.groups.io>
Subject: [puny] The Emperor Has No Clothes

 

All

 

    Jennifer Senior, in her op-ed piece in this morning's New York Times, probably lays the situation out as plainly as anyone I have seen to date.

 

    Thoughts?  Reactions?

 

    Aloha,

 

        Lars

 

=================================

 

 

This Is What Happens When a Narcissist Runs a Crisis

Trump’s catastrophic performance has as much to do with psychology as ideology.

By Jennifer Senior                             

Opinion columnist

April 5, 2020

 

Since the early days of the Trump administration, an impassioned group of mental health professionals have warned the public about the president’s cramped and disordered mind, a darkened attic of fluttering bats. Their assessments have been controversial. The American Psychiatric Association’s code of ethics expressly forbids its members from diagnosing a public figure from afar.

Enough is enough. As I’ve argued before, an in-person analysis of Donald J. Trump would not reveal any hidden depths — his internal sonar could barely fathom the bottom of a sink — and these are exceptional, urgent times. Back in October, George T. Conway III, the conservative lawyer and husband of Kellyanne, wrote a long, devastating essay for The Atlantic, noting that Trump has all the hallmarks of narcissistic personality disorder. That disorder was dangerous enough during times of prosperity, jeopardizing the moral and institutional foundations of our country.

But now we’re in the midst of a global pandemic. The president’s pathology is endangering not just institutions, but lives.

Let’s start with the basics. First: Narcissistic personalities like Trump harbor skyscraping delusions about their own capabilities. They exaggerate their accomplishments, focus obsessively on projecting power, and wish desperately to win.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump says we’ve got plenty of tests available, when we don’t. He declares that Google is building a comprehensive drive-thru testing website, when it isn’t. He sends a Navy hospital ship to New York and it proves little more than an excuse for a campaign commercial, arriving and sitting almost empty in the Hudson. A New York hospital executive calls it a joke.

Second: The grandiosity of narcissistic personalities belies an extreme fragility, their egos as delicate as foam. They live in terror of being upstaged. They’re too thin skinned to be told they’re wrong.

What that means, during this pandemic: Narcissistic leaders never have, as Trump likes to say, the best people. They have galleries of sycophants. With the exceptions of Drs. Anthony Fauci and Deborah Birx, Trump has surrounded himself with a Z-team of dangerously inexperienced toadies and flunkies — the bargain-bin rejects from Filene’s Basement — at a time when we require the brightest and most imaginative minds in the country.

Faced with a historic public health crisis, Trump could have assembled a first-rate company of disaster preparedness experts. Instead he gave the job to his son-in-law, a man-child of breathtaking vapidity. Faced with a historic economic crisis, Trump could have assembled a team of Nobel-prize winning economists or previous treasury secretaries. Instead he talks to Larry Kudlow, a former CNBC host.

Meanwhile, Fauci and Birx measure every word they say like old-time apothecaries, hoping not to humiliate the narcissist — neverhumiliate a narcissist — while discreetly correcting his false hopes and falsehoods. They are desperately attempting to create a safe space for our president, when the president should be creating a safer nation for all of us.

Third: Narcissistic personalities love nothing more than engineering conflict and sowing division. It destabilizes everyone, keeps them in control.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is pitting state against state for precious resources, rather than coordinating a national response. (“It’s like being on eBay,” complained Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York last week.) His White House is a petty palace of competing power centers. He picks fights with Democratic officials and members of the press, when all the public craves is comfort.

Narcissistic personalities don’t do comfort. They cannot fathom the needs of other hearts.

Fourth: Narcissistic personalities are vindictive. On a clear day, you can see their grudges forever.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is playing favorites with governors who praise him and punishing those who fail to give him the respect he believes he deserves. “If they don’t treat you right, don’t call,” he told Vice President Mike Pence.

His grudge match with New York is now especially lethal. When asked on Friday whether New York will have enough ventilators, Trump bluntly answered “No,” and then blamed the state.

And most relevant, as far as history is concerned: Narcissistic personalities are weak.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is genuinely afraid to lead. He can’t bring himself to make robust use of the Defense Production Act, because the buck would stop with him. (To this day, he insists states should be acquiring their own ventilators.) When asked about delays in testing, he said, “I don’t take responsibility at all.” During Friday’s news conference, he added the tests “we inherited were “broken, were obsolete,” when this form of coronavirus didn’t even exist under his predecessor.

This sounds an awful lot like one of the three sentences that Homer Simpson swears will get you through life: “It was like that when I got here.”

Most people, even the most hotheaded and difficult ones, have enough space in their souls to set aside their anger in times of crisis. Think of Rudolph Giuliani during Sept. 11. Think of Andrew Cuomo now.

But every aspect of Trump’s crisis management has been annexed by his psychopathology. As Americans die, he boasts about his television ratings. As Americans die, he crows that he’s No. 1 on Facebook, which isn’t close to true.

But it is true that all eyes are on him. He’s got a captive audience, an attention-addict’s dream come to life. It’s just that he, like all narcissistic personalities, has no clue how disgracefully — how shamefully, how deplorably — he’ll be enshrined in memory.

Jennifer Senior has been an Op-Ed columnist since September 2018. She had been a daily book critic for The Times; before that, she spent many years as a staff writer for New York magazine. Her best-selling book, "All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood," has been translated into 12 languages.

A version of this article appears in print on April 6, 2020, Section A, Page 23 of the New York edition with the headline: Trump’s Narcissism Could Cost Us Our Lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                


Rogue Riddle 1018 - Doubles - Status #5 and Clue Set #3 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Kirk still remains the only player this week.  Where is everyone?

 

Hints:

 

=   Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY, nor are any words in the answer to a riddle included in the set-up for that riddle.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of the answers.

 

=   There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

 

=   Why might there be 26 riddles this week?

 

Clue Set #1:  The letter counts for the first five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #2:  The letter counts for the second five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #3:  The letter counts for the third five riddles are given below.

 

    There must be some new players out there as well ads the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

      (7 / 1, 4, 3)

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

       (6, 5 / 11)

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

       (3, 1-4 / 8)

 

4.  With results BLANK, the chances for success appear BLANK.

     (3, 5 / 6)

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

      (2, 1, 4 / 6)

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

      (3, 4 / 6)

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

      (4, 3 / 6)

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 6)

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

      (6 / 2, 4)

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

        (3, 4 / 7)

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.
         (7 / 4, 4)

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

        (4, 3 / 7)

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

         (5, 4 / 7)

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

        (7 / 3, 4)

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labor BLANK.

        (7 / 2, 1, 4)

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


The Emperor Has No Clothes

Lars Hanson
 

All

    Jennifer Senior, in her op-ed piece in this morning's New York Times, probably lays the situation out as plainly as anyone I have seen to date.

    Thoughts?  Reactions?

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

 

This Is What Happens When a Narcissist Runs a Crisis

Trump’s catastrophic performance has as much to do with psychology as ideology.

By Jennifer Senior                             

Opinion columnist

April 5, 2020


Since the early days of the Trump administration, an impassioned group of mental health professionals have warned the public about the president’s cramped and disordered mind, a darkened attic of fluttering bats. Their assessments have been controversial. The American Psychiatric Association’s code of ethics expressly forbids its members from diagnosing a public figure from afar.

Enough is enough. As I’ve argued before, an in-person analysis of Donald J. Trump would not reveal any hidden depths — his internal sonar could barely fathom the bottom of a sink — and these are exceptional, urgent times. Back in October, George T. Conway III, the conservative lawyer and husband of Kellyanne, wrote a long, devastating essay for The Atlantic, noting that Trump has all the hallmarks of narcissistic personality disorder. That disorder was dangerous enough during times of prosperity, jeopardizing the moral and institutional foundations of our country.

But now we’re in the midst of a global pandemic. The president’s pathology is endangering not just institutions, but lives.

Let’s start with the basics. First: Narcissistic personalities like Trump harbor skyscraping delusions about their own capabilities. They exaggerate their accomplishments, focus obsessively on projecting power, and wish desperately to win.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump says we’ve got plenty of tests available, when we don’t. He declares that Google is building a comprehensive drive-thru testing website, when it isn’t. He sends a Navy hospital ship to New York and it proves little more than an excuse for a campaign commercial, arriving and sitting almost empty in the Hudson. A New York hospital executive calls it a joke.

Second: The grandiosity of narcissistic personalities belies an extreme fragility, their egos as delicate as foam. They live in terror of being upstaged. They’re too thin skinned to be told they’re wrong.

What that means, during this pandemic: Narcissistic leaders never have, as Trump likes to say, the best people. They have galleries of sycophants. With the exceptions of Drs. Anthony Fauci and Deborah Birx, Trump has surrounded himself with a Z-team of dangerously inexperienced toadies and flunkies — the bargain-bin rejects from Filene’s Basement — at a time when we require the brightest and most imaginative minds in the country.

Faced with a historic public health crisis, Trump could have assembled a first-rate company of disaster preparedness experts. Instead he gave the job to his son-in-law, a man-child of breathtaking vapidity. Faced with a historic economic crisis, Trump could have assembled a team of Nobel-prize winning economists or previous treasury secretaries. Instead he talks to Larry Kudlow, a former CNBC host.

Meanwhile, Fauci and Birx measure every word they say like old-time apothecaries, hoping not to humiliate the narcissist — neverhumiliate a narcissist — while discreetly correcting his false hopes and falsehoods. They are desperately attempting to create a safe space for our president, when the president should be creating a safer nation for all of us.

Third: Narcissistic personalities love nothing more than engineering conflict and sowing division. It destabilizes everyone, keeps them in control.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is pitting state against state for precious resources, rather than coordinating a national response. (“It’s like being on eBay,” complained Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York last week.) His White House is a petty palace of competing power centers. He picks fights with Democratic officials and members of the press, when all the public craves is comfort.

Narcissistic personalities don’t do comfort. They cannot fathom the needs of other hearts.

Fourth: Narcissistic personalities are vindictive. On a clear day, you can see their grudges forever.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is playing favorites with governors who praise him and punishing those who fail to give him the respect he believes he deserves. “If they don’t treat you right, don’t call,” he told Vice President Mike Pence.

His grudge match with New York is now especially lethal. When asked on Friday whether New York will have enough ventilators, Trump bluntly answered “No,” and then blamed the state.

And most relevant, as far as history is concerned: Narcissistic personalities are weak.

What that means, during this pandemic: Trump is genuinely afraid to lead. He can’t bring himself to make robust use of the Defense Production Act, because the buck would stop with him. (To this day, he insists states should be acquiring their own ventilators.) When asked about delays in testing, he said, “I don’t take responsibility at all.” During Friday’s news conference, he added the tests “we inherited were “broken, were obsolete,” when this form of coronavirus didn’t even exist under his predecessor.

This sounds an awful lot like one of the three sentences that Homer Simpson swears will get you through life: “It was like that when I got here.”

Most people, even the most hotheaded and difficult ones, have enough space in their souls to set aside their anger in times of crisis. Think of Rudolph Giuliani during Sept. 11. Think of Andrew Cuomo now.

But every aspect of Trump’s crisis management has been annexed by his psychopathology. As Americans die, he boasts about his television ratings. As Americans die, he crows that he’s No. 1 on Facebook, which isn’t close to true.

But it is true that all eyes are on him. He’s got a captive audience, an attention-addict’s dream come to life. It’s just that he, like all narcissistic personalities, has no clue how disgracefully — how shamefully, how deplorably — he’ll be enshrined in memory.

Jennifer Senior has been an Op-Ed columnist since September 2018. She had been a daily book critic for The Times; before that, she spent many years as a staff writer for New York magazine. Her best-selling book, "All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood," has been translated into 12 languages.

A version of this article appears in print on April 6, 2020, Section A, Page 23 of the New York edition with the headline: Trump’s Narcissism Could Cost Us Our Lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                


Rogue Riddle #1018 - Doubles - Status #4 and Clue Set #2

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Kirk remains the only player this week.  Where is everyone?

 

Hints:

 

=   Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY, nor are any words in the answer to a riddle included in the set-up for that riddle.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of the answers.

 

=   There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  The letter counts for the first five riddles are given below.

 

Clue Set #2:  The letter counts for the next five riddles are given below.

 

    There must be some new players out there as well ads the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

      (7 / 1, 4, 3)

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

       (6, 5 / 11)

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

       (3, 1-4 / 8)

 

4.  With results BLANK, the chances for success appear BLANK.

     (3, 5 / 6)

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

      (2, 1, 4 / 6)

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

      (3, 4 / 6)

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

      (4, 3 / 6)

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 6)

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

      (6 / 2, 4)

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

        (3, 4 / 7)

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labor BLANK.

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1018 - Doubles - Status 3 and Clue Set 1 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Kirk remains the only player this week.  Where is everyone?

 

Hints:

  • Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY, nor are any words in the answer to a riddle included in the set-up for that riddle.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of the answers.
  • There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

Clue Set #1:  The letter counts for the first five riddles are given below.

 

    There must be some new players out there as well ads the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

      (7 / 1, 4, 3)

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

       (6, 5 / 11)

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

       (3, 1-4 / 8)

 

4.  With results BLANK, the chances for success appear BLANK.

     (3, 5 / 6)

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

      (2, 1, 4 / 6)

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labor BLANK.

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1018 - Doubles -- Status -- #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Kirk was first out of the blocks this week.  No other players have yet surfaced.

 

    In addition, the ever-vigilant Kirk has identified another minor typo in riddle #3, which has been corrected below.

 

    Hints:

 

Answers have not been used in posts to PUNY.   For instance, my mention of corsets / core sets is not contained in any of he answers.

 

There is a pattern here which, when discovered, will provide valuable clues.

 

    There must be some new players out there as well ads the usual suspects.  Where are you all?

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

 

4.  With  results BLANK, he chances for success appear BLANK.

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labor BLANK.

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Re: Rogue Riddle 1018 - CORRECTED #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    Beware simply hitting "Reply" on the last version of Rogue Riddle 1018 which I just surest out, as doing so will send your response to the whole list.  I had neglected to include the text #RogueRiddle which ensures replies will come only to me.

    This post corrects that omission.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020 at 3:30 PM Lars Hanson via groups.io <parkersan2001=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

All,


    Many thanks to Kirk for identifying some typographical errors in this week's riddle posting.  These have been corrected in the text below.


<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1018

Doubles

 

    Paronomasiacs, punsters, play with similar sounds of different words or phrases to wrest new meanings from them, which often leaves those not so inclined feeling wrest-less.  Wordplay has been around for centuries, perhaps even millennia.  Shakespeare’s plays are replete with puns and double-entendres, often lascivious verbal twists which Elizabethans loved and listened for.

 

    Puns often do not do was well in writing unless the reader is a punster.  With autocorrect and voice dictation apps, seeing “to” instead of “too” or “two” all to often is regarded as a typographical error rather than a pun.

 

    Nevertheless, for the past 19½ years the Rogue Riddles have persisted.  (For those inclined to mark lands, Rogue Riddle 1044 will mark 20 years.)  And before them were three or four years of round-robin riddles, passed from one riddler to the next.

    

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty-six riddles, each of which has two answers which sound similar.  For instance:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    Note that the word “BLANK” may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the word “BLANK” may be preceded by the word “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word the “BLANK” replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  There are one or two obscure words in the mix, for reasons which will become more obvious as the riddles are solved.  Consider these the “4.0 busters” in the mix.  

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle #1019 next week.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  To defend his cornfield against avian predators, the agile BLANK swung at them with BLANK.

 

2.  In an attempt to dissuade attackers from their siege, the castle’s defenders threw candies down at them from the walls.  Yes, the defenders bombarded the enemy with BLANK thrown down from the BLANK.

 

3.  The feline’s muzzle was bloodied from its prey.  Looking at the its face, the pet’s owner wondered whether BLANK might be a new BLANK of horror film.

 

4.  With  results BLANK, he chances for success appear BLANK.

 

5.  The starving man was so hungry that when he came to a field and found no horse therein, he BLANK instead and found it quite BLANK.

 

6.  When so BLANK, farming becomes BLANK.

 

7.  He was supremely frustrated by Churchill’s walk spoiled.  "What’s BLANK," the BLANK wondered.

 

8.  Hoarding reduces the supplies for all.  Markets are responding by limiting purchases.  For instance, at one market the limit was one BLANK BLANK.

 

9.  When a soldier has a bad BLANK, it is difficult to march BLANK.

 

10.  Off the coast of Israel one can see a BLANK for BLANK.

 

11.  Among the BLANK, company generally will be offered a BLANK at dinner.

 

12.  The diver’s BLANK revealed a BLANK.

 

13.  Doctors are being suspended or even fired for speaking out during the current Covid-19 crisis.  There is great concern that this BLANK will result in shortages of BLANK personnel.

 

14.  It is the mesh, the BLANK, with makes the BLANK.

 

15.  Was that BLANK delivered by Labor BLANK.

 

16.  Rote memorization guarantees consistency in acting, but occasionally actors have to ad lib.  This raises the obvious question of whether they will BLANK BLANK on any given night.

 

17.  In medieval times, when housing was full, the BLANK would block entrance with a BLANK.

 

18.  Despite his concerns about having trouble getting repaid, the man decided to BLANK and BLANK his nephew money.

 

19.  Inspectors need to examine products to determine whether or not quality is being maintained.  Nationally, one might see uncle BLANK a BLANK for evaluation.

 

20.  Before one elects to BLANK, one best ensure this horned creature is in fact BLANK.

 

21.  The baseball league would cremate a BLANK in a BLANK.

 

22.  The maker of women’s undergarments devised one to help with posture and named it accordingly.  “The BLANK will keep your BLANK aligned,” the ads proclaimed.

 

23.  She became despondent easily, and when her lover was not BLANK she would BLANK.

 

24.  North African mariners often succumb to BLANK and call of the BLANK.

 

25.  With a fierce look, the Turkish warrior drew his BLANK BLANK.

 

26.  The North African natives drove a BLANK into their BLANK.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

  

    As always, it would be great to see more new faces this week, whether or not you want to host next week’s Rogue Riddle!  Please remember to tell me on your first guesses whether or not you are willing to host if you win.

 

    The purpose here is to have fun, so 

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================