Date   
ROGUE RIDDLE #1035 (Bingo & reveal)

gary hallock
 

It kind of surprised me that so many players were willing to stay up late to receive and work on this riddle. Three of the players submitted their solutions within the first hour and another few in the wee small hours of Monday morning.

First out of the gate with a clean sweep was Erika Ettin, followed quickly by Lars Hanson and Doug Spector. Bringing up the rear were Chris Gross, Adam Engel, Jon Gearhart and Bill Crider. Nearly everyone knocking this one out of the park.

Trigger happy Erika was the clear victor here but she seems as eager as I am to see what Doug has up his sleeve, so watch for his version of Rogue Riddle #1036 to appear in your mailbox some day (or night) next weekend.

As usual, I have filled in the BLANKs in the verses below. Thank you all for playing

Gary (Leerless Feeder) Hallock

==============

ROGUE RIDDLE #1035 - Launched Sunday, August 9, 2020 @ 10pm central

^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)

Below you will find a series of 5 limerick verses, the first 4 of these contain one or more BLANK spaces to fill with a single common word. Identify, rearrange (and possibly pun) each of these missing words to assemble a 6 word phrase that will makes some phonetic sense in completing the missing words (BLANKS) in the final line of the 5th verse, a.k.a. the “real” question. (Target in this case will be a slight variation on an otherwise readily recognizable phrase.)

First guesser who provides me with all the correct words in the proper order wins the honor/responsibility of hosting/posting RR# 1036 next weekend.

^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)

1.
Stored crops in a tall silo vault
Were attacked and it was all the fault
Of stalkers of BLANK ‘n’
By them were all beaten
Take this with a large grain assault
#### WHEAT

2.
Young skate boarder had quite a flair
For making great leaps everywhere
At his day job he flew
Pretty high in that too
As a deejay he got some good BLANK
#### AIR

3.
On a large leg of lamb did I BLANK
But the bone was oak splinters, Boo-Hoo!
“Mutton chef,” I protested,
“This can’t be digested
I’d say something’s wrong, wooden BLANK?”
#### CHEW #### EWE

4.
The clock maker’s son nearly blew it
He wanted a Rolex, but knew it
Would displease his pop
Who would tell the boy, “Stop!
BLANK on my BLANK will you do it”
#### KNOT/NOT #### WATCH

5.
Now here is an irony, sweet
All vegans are made out of meat
Though your diet is known
Not to be bread alone
‘Tis clear BLANK BLANK BLANK BLANK BLANK BLANK.
#### WHEAT AIR CHEW EWE KNOT WATCH
#### EWE AIR KNOT WATCH CHEW WHEAT

^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)


--
Gary (Immodest Moderator) Hallock, Leerless Feeder

Re: Rogue Riddle 1034 -- Winner Declared and Answers Revealed

Marilyn Van Driesen
 

Lars, I am in several other group.io list and moderate others, so I put them all mvandriesen@... to save confusion for myself, aging brain and all. EmojiEmojiEmoji  I've been so busy, and then our internet was gone for half a day so I am more behind than usual.

I 'think' I finished the first 3 of Gary's limericks and after that became befuddled.  Not having much time, I set it aside for a while.

Marilyn/Merk

On Monday, August 10, 2020, 06:16:12 AM CDT, Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...> wrote:


Marilyn,

    I forwarded Rogue Riddle #1035 to you just 7 minutes after it was posted.  Did you not receive that forwarding?

    You might want to check your e-mail spam folders.

    It should be noted that one of your two e-mail addresses regularly rejects e-mails.

    You may want to check your registration at PUNY to see which email address is listed there.

    Finally, please note that I am copying Miss Elainey, another PUNY subgroup used for administrative issues, plus your own address on this e-mail.

    Just a thought or two....

    Aloha,

        Lars

======================

On Aug 10, 2020, at 00:07, Marilyn L. Van Driesen <mvandriesen@...> wrote:

I have not gotten any emails since this one.  Should Rogue Riddle 1035 by posted somewhere?
--
Marilyn L.

Re: Rogue Riddle 1034 -- Winner Declared and Answers Revealed

Lars Hanson
 

Marilyn,

    I forwarded Rogue Riddle #1035 to you just 7 minutes after it was posted.  Did you not receive that forwarding?

    You might want to check your e-mail spam folders.

    It should be noted that one of your two e-mail addresses regularly rejects e-mails.

    You may want to check your registration at PUNY to see which email address is listed there.

    Finally, please note that I am copying Miss Elainey, another PUNY subgroup used for administrative issues, plus your own address on this e-mail.

    Just a thought or two....

    Aloha,

        Lars

======================

On Aug 10, 2020, at 00:07, Marilyn L. Van Driesen <mvandriesen@...> wrote:

I have not gotten any emails since this one.  Should Rogue Riddle 1035 by posted somewhere?
--
Marilyn L.

Re: Rogue Riddle 1034 -- Winner Declared and Answers Revealed

Marilyn L. Van Driesen
 

I have not gotten any emails since this one.  Should Rogue Riddle 1035 by posted somewhere?
--
Marilyn L.

#ROGUERIDDLE number 1035 #RogueRiddle

gary hallock
 

ROGUE RIDDLE #1035 - Launched Sunday, August 9, 2020 @ 10pm central

^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^
Submit all guesses, grumps, gripes & guffaws directly to <gary@...>
^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^

Below you will find a series of 5 limerick verses, the first 4 of these contain one or more BLANK spaces to fill with a single common word. Identify, rearrange (and possibly pun) each of these missing words to assemble a 6 word phrase that will makes some phonetic sense in completing the missing words (BLANKS) in the final line of the 5th verse, a.k.a. the “real” question. (Target in this case will be a slight variation on an otherwise readily recognizable phrase.)

First guesser who provides me with all the correct words in the proper order wins the honor/responsibility of hosting/posting RR# 1036 next weekend.

^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^
Submit all guesses, grumps, gripes & guffaws directly to <gary@...>
^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^

1.
Stored crops in a tall silo vault
Were attacked and it was all the fault
Of stalkers of BLANK ‘n’
By them were all beaten
Take this with a large grain assault

2.
Young skate boarder had quite a flair
For making great leaps everywhere
At his day job he flew
Pretty high in that too
As a deejay he got some good BLANK

3.
On a large leg of lamb did I BLANK
But the bone was oak splinters, Boo-Hoo!
“Mutton chef,” I protested,
“This can’t be digested
I’d say something’s wrong, wooden BLANK?”

4.
The clock maker’s son nearly blew it
He wanted a Rolex, but knew it
Would displease his pop
Who would tell the boy, “Stop!
BLANK on my BLANK will you do it”

5.
Now here is an irony, sweet
All vegans are made out of meat
Though your diet is known
Not to be bread alone
‘Tis clear BLANK BLANK BLANK BLANK BLANK BLANK.

^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^)^
Submit all guesses, grumps, gripes & guffaws directly to <gary@...>
^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^(^


--
Gary (Immodest Moderator) Hallock, Leerless Feeder

RR #1035 (20 minute warning)

gary hallock
 

A late evening launch is better than a Monday launch.

Real life interfered with my weekend plans and caused a significant delay in the creative process.

Expect to see RR #1035 at 10pm central.

Gary Hallock



--
Gary (Immodest Moderator) Hallock, Leerless Feeder

Rogue Riddle 1034 -- Winner Declared and Answers Revealed

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    There were 5 players this week:  Jim, Gary, Aaron, Marilyn, and Bill., in order of joining the game.  Very early on, Gary gained the lead with 13 clean kills and two partials.    Aaron seized second place with 11 kills and two partials.


The final standings were as follows:

 

Gary H – 13 correct + 2 partials (70%):  1, 3, 4, 9 – 17, 19, plus partials on 6 and 8

Aaron Fasel – 11 correct + 2 partials (60%):  1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 17, 19, plus partials on 7 and 18

Bill Crider – 9 correct + 2 partials (50%):  1, 3, 4, 6, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, plus partials on 15 and 18

Jim Ertner – 7 correct (35%): 1, 3, 4, 12, 13, 15, 19

Marilyn –-1 correct (5%):  12 

 

    Gary will host Rogue Riddle #1035 next week.


    Final riddle stats (5 players):

 

5 correct –  1:   12

4 correct –  4:   1, 4, 13, 19

3 correct –  2:   3, 15

2 correct –  4:   6, 10, 14, 17, 

1 correct – 7:   5, 8, 9, 11, 16, 18, 20

0 correct – 2:   2, 7

 

    Only two riddles remained unanswered:  #2, likely because of the length of the answer, and #7, the “4.0 buster,” because it was a bit esoteric.  Solving #2 required one using all the information in the set-up.  All the other riddles fell to at least one player, as the statistics show.

 

    I hope that you all enjoyed this week’s Rogue Riddle.

 

    The answers to the riddles are included below.  Instead of listing them after the riddle, I have embedded the answers within each riddle. 

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1034

Another Potpourri

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.   There are Spoonerism, homophones, and a few daffynitions thrown in for good measure. As an example of homophones:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK   become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    One “BLANK” is used for each answer, where needed. Note that the indicator BLANK may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the BLANK may be preceded by the article “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word or words the BLANK replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.

 

Hint:  As always, be sure to read the set-ups carefully and try to use all the information contained in them.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  They lived next to a church whose bells rang the time regularly, so they always knew the hours because the bells TOLLED / TOLD them.

 

2.  Whenever the inmates went out to work growing vegetables, there were men to watch over them to make sure none escaped.   They were GUARDIN’ THE PRISONERS in THE PRISONERS’ GARDEN.

 

3.  A-MAZED or AMAZED – Lost in a convoluted hedge.

 

4.  The Scotsman asked his pupil, “Laddie, dinna ye kin what they call that wee bit that sticks up on a sundial and casts a shadow?”  Quite naturally, the boy replied, “NO, MON / GNOMON.”

 

5.  In what is perhaps the most famous photograph of Marilyn Monroe, her skirt is lofted upward.  Could it be there was a BLOWER BELOW ‘ER?

 

6.  When Theodore and his husband moved into the development the residents were very happy.  They all thought that security had been enhanced now that they lived in a  GAY TED COMMUNITY / GATED COMMUNITY

 

7.  Down Under the language is quite different to elsewhere.  Many find listening to STRINE to be a STRAIN.  (The Aussies pronounce the two words almost identically.  “Strine” comes from the Aussie pronunciation of “Australian.”)

 

8.  What is the difference between a vitreous classic penny loafer and a particular Scotsman?  One is a GLASS WEEJUN and the other is a GLASWEGIAN.

 

9.  The song and dance about Mother Brown calls for a COCK KNEE or COCKED KNEE / COCKNEY, which sounds like a distinctive English dialect.

 

10.   What happens when reciting a collection of Walt Whitman’s poetry to a sad young lady?  One reads LEAVES OF GRASS, while there GRIEVES A LASS. 

 

11.  What is the difference between a monster’s home and an arrow with no notch for the bowstring?  One is LOCH NESS, while the other is NOCKLESS.

 

12.  Why are Dutch flowers like what one kisses with?  Both are TULIPS / TWO LIPS.

 

13.   Why are ghosts so often drunk?  It’s because of all the BOOS / BOOZE.  (Another good guess was “spirits.”)

 

14.   He was a poor student, always arriving late to school.  The teacher naturally asked his parents. “What time does the SON RISE / SUN RISE?”

 

15.  What is the difference between a drapery support and solid bit of soured milk?  One is a CURTAIN ROD, while the other is a ROTTEN CURD.

 

16.  What is the difference between a diploma and an inexpensive pelt?  One is a SHEEPSKIN while the other is a CHEAP SKIN.

 

17.  What is the difference between a fellow lead actor and something to put under a glass?  One is a CO-STAR, while the other is a COASTER.

 

18.  There are just two major aircraft manufacturers, so when we are flying there are times when an AIRBUS will BEAR US from one place to the next.

 

19.  What is the difference between a pantomime game and something to help one blacken a surface by burning?  One is a CHARADE, while the other is a CHAR AID.

 

20.   ECONOMIST – A cheap fog.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    It was great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Thank you all for playing!


    Take it away, Gary!

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

Re: Message Rejected

Marilyn Van Driesen
 

Yes, I should have responded earlier.  Our world is about upside down now with busyness.  You've heard of "biting off more than you can chew"?  That was us today and I fear also tomorrow.  Thank you for the wonderful clues.  I really appreciate them.

Marilyn

On Tuesday, August 4, 2020, 10:21:34 AM CDT, Lars Hanson <parkersan2001@...> wrote:


Marilyn,

    I tried replying directly to you yesterday, but my reply was rejected by your server.

    I then tried a different address for you.

    Did you receive my reply on your guesses on Rogue Riddle #1034?  Please advise.

    Thanks.

    Aloha,

        Lars

======================Yes


Message Rejected

Lars Hanson
 

Marilyn,

I tried replying directly to you yesterday, but my reply was rejected by your server.

I then tried a different address for you.

Did you receive my reply on your guesses on Rogue Riddle #1034? Please advise.

Thanks.

Aloha,

Lars

======================

Re: Rogue Riddle 1034 - #RogueRiddle - Status 3 and Clue Sets 2 & 3 #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,
 
    No change since yesterday, so perhaps it is time for another round of clues.

   But first, some current riddle statistics (4 players):

     4 correct  1:   12

     3 correct –  5:   1, 4, 13, 15, 19

     2 correct –  3:   3, 10, 17

     1 correct   7:   5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 14, 16, 

     0 correct  4:   2, 7, 18, 20


Hints:
 
    For the newcomers here, perhaps a quick explanation is in order.  Usually (but not always, depending on the host), complete answers are used.  This eliminates any necessity for the host having to make any assumptions about what may or may not have been intended.
 
    Also, over the 22-plus years we have been doing this, some other conventions and customs have arisen which help in solving these.  Such usages will become apparent over time.  It is useful to keep the various forms in mind:

Homophones:  Same word or phrase but spelled or use differently, as in the example provided in this week's introduction:  
Q:  She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK   become the first person to BLANK.
A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

Spoonerisms:  Like Marilyn's riddles last week in which the initial letters or sounds of something are exchanged.  The something may be a word or a phrase:  A well-brushed equine is a CURRIED HORSE while rapid teaching makes for a HURRIED COURSE.  A Spoonerism often is indicated or signaled by a question beginning with, "What is the difference between...?," but not always.

Daffynition:  A daffy definition of a word may be provided or asked for (either way).  In the case of the word being defined, a one-word answer usually suffices, and there will not be two answers to the riddle.

    With my setups, I usually take some pains to incorporate all the necessary information in the setup (the text of the riddle), and to minimize any extraneous information.  Obviously, this cannot always be achieved, but I do try.  Thus, with my riddles, it pays to look at the wording carefully.  Others tend to be less specific.
 
    Reading the introduction to a Rogue Riddle set almost always helps.  If there is a theme, it may be identified there or in the title.  In addition, some special requirements may be identified there as well.  For instance, in this week's introduction it is noted that the word BLANK may refer to one or more words in the answer.  (This is not always the case. Sometimes each word in a multi-word answer may be replaced by a BLANK.) 
 
    Finally, the way to get further clues usually is to submit guesses.  With the responses to guesses normally (but not always!) come additional clues.
 
Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first ten riddles are provided below.  (Yes, the inclusions of apostrophes are intentional.)

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the last ten riddles are provided below.  (Yes, the inclusions of apostrophes are intentional.)

Clue Set #3:  Clues are provided for the four unanswered riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
Rogue Riddle #1034
Another Potpourri
 
    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.   There are Spoonerism, homophones, and a few daffynitions thrown in for good measure. As an example of homophones:
 
Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK   become the first person to BLANK.
A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT
 
    One “BLANK” is used for each answer, where needed. Note that the indicator BLANK may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the BLANK may be preceded by the article “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word or words the BLANK replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”
 
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.
 
    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
Hint:  As always, be sure to read the set-ups carefully and try to use all the information contained in them.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
1.  They lived next to a church whose bells rang the time regularly, so they always knew the hours because the bells BLANK them.
       (6 / 4)
 
2.  Whenever the inmates went out to work growing vegetables, there were men to watch over them to make sure none escaped.   They were BLANK in BLANK.
     (7’, 3, 9 / 3, 9’, 6)
    This needs to be complete.  Who is doing the watching?  What is that watching called?  Who is being watched?  Where?
 
3.  BLANK – Lost in a convoluted hedge.
     (1-5 or 6)
 
4.  The Scotsman asked his pupil, “Laddie, dinna ye kin what they call that wee bit that sticks up on a sundial and casts a shadow?”  Quite naturally, the boy replied, “BLANK.”
    (2, 3 / 6)
 
5.  In what is perhaps the most famous photograph of Marilyn Monroe, her skirt is lofted upward.  Could it be there was a BLANK BLANK?
      (6, 5, ‘2)
 
6.  When Theodore and his husband moved into the development the residents were very happy.  They all thought that security had been enhanced now that they lived in a BLANK.
       (3, 3, 9 / 5, 9)
 
7.  Down Under the language is quite different to elsewhere.  Many find listening to BLANK to be a BLANK.
      (6 / 6)
     This uses an Australian term for Australian English which is based on their pronunciation..
 
8.  What is the difference between a vitreous classic penny loafer and a particular Scotsman?  One is a BLANK and the other is a BLANK.
       (5, 6 / 10)
 
9.  The song and dance about Mother Brown calls for a BLANK, which sounds like a distinctive English dialect.
      (6, 4 / 7)
 
10.   What happens when reciting a collection of Walt Whitman’s poetry to a sad young lady?  One reads BLANK, while there BLANK. 
         (6, 2, 5 / 7, 1, 4)
 
11.  What is the difference between a monster’s home and an arrow with no notch for the bowstring?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.
      (4, 4 / 8)
 
12.  Why are Dutch flowers like what one kisses with?  Both are BLANK.
      (6 / 3, 4)
 
13.   Why are ghosts so often drunk?  It’s because of all the BLANK.
       (4 / 5)
 
14.   He was a poor student, always arriving late to school.  The teacher naturally asked his parents. “What time does the BLANK?”
       (3, 4 / 3, 4)
 
15.  What is the difference between a drapery support and solid bit of soured milk?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
      (7, 3 / 6, 4)
 
16.  What is the difference between a diploma and an inexpensive pelt?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.
      (9 / 5, 4)
 
17.  What is the difference between a fellow lead actor and something to put under a glass?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
      (2-4 / 7)
 
18.  There are just two major aircraft manufacturers, so when we are flying there are times when a BLANK will BLANK from one place to the next.
      (6 / 4, 2)
      If you guess the wrong one, try the other.
 
19.  What is the difference between a pantomime game and something to help one blacken a surface by burning?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
       (7 / 4, 3)
 
20.   BLANK – A cheap fog.
        (9)
        What is another word for fog?  What is a common advertising prefix meaning cheap?
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  
 
    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:
 
parkersan2001@...

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1034 - #RogueRiddle - Status 2 and Clue Set 1 #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    This week's Rogue Riddle is off to an excellent start.  So far Jim, Gary, Aaron, and Marilyn all have scored kills.  Now it is time for some hints and clues.

 

Hints:

 

    For the newcomers here, perhaps a quick explanation is in order.  Usually (but not always, depending on the host), complete answers are used.  This eliminates any necessity for the host having to make any assumptions about what may or may not have been intended.

 

    Also, over the 22-plus years we have been doing this, some other conventions and customs have arisen which help in solving these.  Such usages will become apparent over time.  It is useful to keep the various forms in mind:


Homophones:  Same word or phrase but spelled or use differently, as in the example provided in this week's introduction:  

Q:  She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK   become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT


Spoonerisms:  Like Marilyn's riddles last week in which the initial letters or sounds of something are exchanged.  The something may be a word or a phrase:  A well-brushed equine is a CURRIED HORSE while rapid teaching makes for a HURRIED COURSE.  A Spoonerism often is indicated or signaled by a question beginning with, "What is the difference between...?," but not always.


Daffynition:  A daffy definition of a word may be provided or asked for (either way).  In the case of the word being defined, a one-word answer usually suffices, and there will not be two answers to the riddle.


    With my setups, I usually take some pains to incorporate all the necessary information in the setup (the text of the riddle), and to minimize any extraneous information.  Obviously, this cannot always be achieved, but I do try.  Thus, with my riddles, it pays to look at the wording carefully.  Others tend to be less specific.

 

    Reading the introduction to a Rogue Riddle set almost always helps.  If there is a theme, it may be identified there or in the title.  In addition, some special requirements may be identified there as well.  For instance, in this week's introduction it is noted that the word BLANK may refer to one or more words in the answer.  (This is not always the case. Sometimes each word in a multi-word answer may be replaced by a BLANK.) 

 

    Finally, the way to get further clues usually is to submit guesses.  With the responses to guesses normally (but not always!) come additional clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first ten riddles are provided below.  (Yes, the inclusions of apostrophes are intentional.)

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1034
Another Potpourri
 
    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.   There are Spoonerism, homophones, and a few daffynitions thrown in for good measure. As an example of homophones:
 
Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK   become the first person to BLANK.
A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT
 
    One “BLANK” is used for each answer, where needed. Note that the indicator BLANK may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the BLANK may be preceded by the article “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word or words the BLANK replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”
 
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.
 
    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.

 

Hint:  As always, be sure to read the set-ups carefully and try to use all the information contained in them.
 

    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
1.  They lived next to a church whose bells rang the time regularly, so they always knew the hours because the bells BLANK them.

       (6 / 4)
 
2.  Whenever the inmates went out to work growing vegetables, there were men to watch over them to make sure none escaped.   They were BLANK in BLANK.

     (7’, 3, 9 / 3, 9’, 6)
 
3.  BLANK – Lost in a convoluted hedge.

     (1-5 or 6)
 
4.  The Scotsman asked his pupil, “Laddie, dinna ye kin what they call that wee bit that sticks up on a sundial and casts a shadow?”  Quite naturally, the boy replied, “BLANK.”

    (2, 3 / 6)
 
5.  In what is perhaps the most famous photograph of Marilyn Monroe, her skirt is lofted upward.  Could it be there was a BLANK BLANK?

      (6, 5, ‘2)
 
6.  When Theodore and his husband moved into the development the residents were very happy.  They all thought that security had been enhanced now that they lived in a BLANK.

       (3, 3, 9 / 5, 9)
 
7.  Down Under the language is quite different to elsewhere.  Many find listening to BLANK to be a BLANK.

      (6 / 6)
 
8.  What is the difference between a vitreous classic penny loafer and a particular Scotsman?  One is a BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

       (5, 6 / 10)
 
9.  The song and dance about Mother Brown calls for a BLANK, which sounds like a distinctive English dialect.

      (6, 4 / 7)
 
10.   What happens when reciting a collection of Walt Whitman’s poetry to a sad young lady?  One reads BLANK, while there BLANK. 

         (6, 2, 5 / 7, 1, 4)
 
11.  What is the difference between a monster’s home and an arrow with no notch for the bowstring?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.
 
12.  Why are Dutch flowers like what one kisses with?  Both are BLANK.
 
13.   Why are ghosts so often drunk?  It’s because of all the BLANK.
 
14.   He was a poor student, always arriving late to school.  The teacher naturally asked his parents. “What time does the BLANK?”
 
15.  What is the difference between a drapery support and solid bit of soured milk?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
 
16.  What is the difference between a diploma and an inexpensive pelt?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.
 
17.  What is the difference between a fellow lead actor and something to put under a glass?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
 
18.  There are just two major aircraft manufacturers, so when we are flying there are times when a BLANK will BLANK from one place to the next.
 
19.  What is the difference between a pantomime game and something to help one blacken a surface by burning?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
 
20.   BLANK – A cheap fog.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  
 
    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:
 
parkersan2001@...

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

Rogue Riddle 1034 - #RogueRiddle -- Status 1 #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    This week's Rogue Riddle is off to an excellent start.  So far Jim, Gary, and Aaron have all scored kills.  Gary currently leads the pack.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
Rogue Riddle #1034
Another Potpourri
 
    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.   There are Spoonerism, homophones, and a few daffynitions thrown in for good measure. As an example of homophones:
 
Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK   become the first person to BLANK.
A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT
 
    One “BLANK” is used for each answer, where needed. Note that the indicator BLANK may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the BLANK may be preceded by the article “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word or words the BLANK replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”
 
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.
 
    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.

Hint:  As always, be sure to read the set-ups carefully and try to use all the information contained in them.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
1.  They lived next to a church whose bells rang the time regularly, so they always knew the hours because the bells BLANK them.
 
2.  Whenever the inmates went out to work growing vegetables, there were men to watch over them to make sure none escaped.   They were BLANK in BLANK.
 
3.  BLANK – Lost in a convoluted hedge.
 
4.  The Scotsman asked his pupil, “Laddie, dinna ye kin what they call that wee bit that sticks up on a sundial and casts a shadow?”  Quite naturally, the boy replied, “BLANK.”
 
5.  In what is perhaps the most famous photograph of Marilyn Monroe, her skirt is lofted upward.  Could it be there was a BLANK BLANK?
 
6.  When Theodore and his husband moved into the development the residents were very happy.  They all thought that security had been enhanced now that they lived in a BLANK.
 
7.  Down Under the language is quite different to elsewhere.  Many find listening to BLANK to be a BLANK.
 
8.  What is the difference between a vitreous classic penny loafer and a particular Scotsman?  One is a BLANK and the other is a BLANK.
 
9.  The song and dance about Mother Brown calls for a BLANK, which sounds like a distinctive English dialect.
 
10.   What happens when reciting a collection of Walt Whitman’s poetry to a sad young lady?  One reads BLANK, while there BLANK. 
 
11.  What is the difference between a monster’s home and an arrow with no notch for the bowstring?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.
 
12.  Why are Dutch flowers like what one kisses with?  Both are BLANK.
 
13.   Why are ghosts so often drunk?  It’s because of all the BLANK.
 
14.   He was a poor student, always arriving late to school.  The teacher naturally asked his parents. “What time does the BLANK?”
 
15.  What is the difference between a drapery support and solid bit of soured milk?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
 
16.  What is the difference between a diploma and an inexpensive pelt?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.
 
17.  What is the difference between a fellow lead actor and something to put under a glass?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
 
18.  There are just two major aircraft manufacturers, so when we are flying there are times when a BLANK will BLANK from one place to the next.
 
19.  What is the difference between a pantomime game and something to help one blacken a surface by burning?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.
 
20.   BLANK – A cheap fog.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  
 
    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:
 
parkersan2001@...
 
    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

Rogue Riddle 1034 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Herewith is this week's Rogue Riddle.  As it appears there has been some more activity of late, we shall try again.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

Rogue Riddle #1034

Another Potpourri

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.   There are Spoonerism, homophones, and a few daffynitions thrown in for good measure. As an example of homophones:

 

Q: She decided that pennies, too, should have knurled edges.  Thus did BLANK   become the first person to BLANK.

A:  MILLICENT / MILL A CENT

 

    One “BLANK” is used for each answer, where needed. Note that the indicator BLANK may stand in for one or more words.  Also, note that the BLANK may be preceded by the article “a.”  This provides no indication of whether or not the word or words the BLANK replaces begins with a vowel or silent “h.”

 

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.

 

    The riddle will run until 5:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.

 

    Now, on to the riddles.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  They lived next to a church whose bells rang the time regularly, so they always knew the hours because the bells BLANK them.

 

2.  Whenever the inmates went out to work growing vegetables, there were men to watch over them to make sure none escaped.   They were BLANK in BLANK.

 

3.  BLANK – Lost in a convoluted hedge.

 

4.  The Scotsman asked his pupil, “Laddie, dinna ye kin what they call that wee bit that sticks up on a sundial and casts a shadow?”  Quite naturally, the boy replied, “BLANK.”

 

5.  In what is perhaps the most famous photograph of Marilyn Monroe, her skirt is lofted upward.  Could it be there was a BLANK BLANK?

 

6.  When Theodore and his husband moved into the development the residents were very happy.  They all thought that security had been enhanced now that they lived in a BLANK.

 

7.  Down Under the language is quite different to elsewhere.  Many find listening to BLANK to be a BLANK.

 

8.  What is the difference between a vitreous classic penny loafer and a particular Scotsman?  One is a BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

9.  The song and dance about Mother Brown calls for a BLANK, which sounds like a distinctive English dialect.

 

10.   What happens when reciting a collection of Walt Whitman’s poetry to a sad young lady?  One reads BLANK, while there BLANK. 

 

11.  What is the difference between a monster’s home and an arrow with no notch for the bowstring?  One is BLANK, while the other is BLANK.

 

12.  Why are Dutch flowers like what one kisses with?  Both are BLANK.

 

13.   Why are ghosts so often drunk?  It’s because of all the BLANK.

 

14.   He was a poor student, always arriving late to school.  The teacher naturally asked his parents. “What time does the BLANK?”

 

15.  What is the difference between a drapery support and solid bit of soured milk?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.

 

16.  What is the difference between a diploma and an inexpensive pelt?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

 

17.  What is the difference between a fellow lead actor and something to put under a glass?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.

 

18.  There are just two major aircraft manufacturers, so when we are flying there are times when a BLANK will BLANK from one place to the next.

 

19.  What is the difference between a pantomime game and something to help one blacken a surface by burning?  One is a BLANK, while the other is a BLANK.

 

20.   BLANK – A cheap fog.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be sure you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================

Rogue Riddle 1034

Lars Hanson
 

All,

Rogue Riddle #1034 will be released later this afternoon.

Aloha,

Lars

======================

Punsters United Nearly Yearly (P.U.N.Y.) Group FAQ / Guidelines Monthly Post #guidelines-notice

main@puny.groups.io Group Moderators <main@...>
 

Punsters United Nearly Yearly (P.U.N.Y.) Group
Frequently Asked Questions / Group Guidelines

=====================================================

Written and maintained by Lee Jackson
PUNY group Administrangler

Document created December 13, 2003
Revision 1.0 created February 6, 2004
Current Revision (2.2) created January 4, 2020

=====================================================

Table of Contents

I. Group Description
II. Common Questions
III. Rogue Riddles
IV. Web Addresses and Contact Information
V. Trademark and Copyright Information / End

=====================================================

I. Group Description

-----------------------------------------------------

Punsters United Nearly Yearly (P.U.N.Y.) is a small, unofficial group, formed in 1990 to assist the O. Henry Home and Museum in Austin, TX. Specifically, we help coordinate and present the museum's largest fundraiser each year, the annual O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships.

The O. Henry Home and Museum is actually inside the house in which the famous short story author William Sydney Porter (a.k.a. O. Henry) lived while in Austin. The house is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

The Pun-Off helps to provide operating and renovation funds for the museum. In the process, we provide free entertainment for over 1,000 spectators each year, collecting funds through raffles, book sales, and audience donations during the event. The Pun-Off is also an event that allows the most twisted minds in the country, P.U.N.Y. members and otherwise, a chance to show just how far the English language can be bent without breaking.

The P.U.N.Y. group was hosted on Yahoo! Groups for what seems like an eternity. It was transitioned to Groups.io beginning on October 18, 2019, and was officially opened for discussion on Groups.io on November 4, 2019.

Discussions shall include and mostly be limited to P.U.N.Y. status announcements, pun challenges and discussions, and basically anything pun-related. Non-pun discussions and discussions about the annual O. Henry World Championships should be taken to the Miss Elainey subgroup.

NOTE: Some messages may contain mildly mature subject matter. Parental discretion is advised. Please keep things at least at a PG level if you join. ;)

Please note that messages posted by new members are moderated at first. This was made necessary by a number of inconsiderate spammers. Also, please note that the moderator reserves the right to reject and/or ban anyone who applies for membership. This is again for anti-spam purposes, so if you join with a member name that looks like a spammer address, you might be banned without notice. If you are a legitimate user and you experience problems with any of this, please notify the group Administrangler.

=====================================================

II. Common Questions

-----------------------------------------------------

Q. I'm getting duplicate messages. Can you help me stop this?

A. Sure! From the Groups.io FAQ: "To turn off duplicate emails, log into your account. Then look for the dropdown in the top right corner of the page, which will be either your name or email address. Click that and then click Account. From your Account page, click the Preferences sidebar tab. Look for the 'I always want copies of my own messages' checkbox and uncheck that. Then click the Update Preferences button."

Q. How do I set up a signature for my account?

A. Again, quoting from the Groups.io FAQ: "To set a signature for your account, go to the Subscription page for your group (it's the 'Subscription' tab in the left hand sidebar when viewing your group). On the subscription page, look for the 'Use Signature For Web Posting' checkbox and check that. Then you will be able to add a signature. Once complete, click the Save button at the bottom of the page to save your changes."

Q. Where is this magical Groups.io FAQ you keep quoting?

A. I'm glad you asked. It's at https://groups.io/static/help#faq . You can always access the Groups.io help system by clicking on the Help button in the upper right corner of the screen when you're logged in to your Groups.io account.

=====================================================

III. Rogue Riddles

-----------------------------------------------------

By far, the most popular feature of the PUNY list is the Rogue Riddle. As of this writing, riddle number 1000 had just finished. For a smooth experience, there are a few guidelines you should follow:

1. Don't use a # symbol in front of the number of the riddle (e.g., #1001) in your topic line. Only use the # symbol for hashtags (see item number 2 below). If you use the # symbol in your topic line, your message will be bounced back to you. Remove the offending # symbol and re-send.

2. *DO* put a #RogueRiddle hashtag somewhere in your new topic line. Groups.io will read this and will direct all replies to you, and not to the group, assuring that there are no public guesses.

3. When you are ready to discuss the answers, start up another new topic from scratch, *without* the #RogueRiddle hashtag in the topic line. This way, discussion of the answers will go to the group and not to you.

4. DON'T try and use variations on the spelling of #RogueRiddle as your hashtag. Is #ROGUERIDDLE# correct? No. Is #Rogue Riddle correct? No, and in fact it's so wrong the system will kick back your message to you.

     i. THERE IS BUT ONE TRUE SPELLING OF #RogueRiddle - ALL OTHERS ARE FALSEHOODS.

5. DON'T ANNOY THE ADMINISTRANGLER BY IGNORING THE ROGUE RIDDLE GUIDELINES. HE WILL EAT YOU.

=====================================================

IV. Web Addresses and Contact Information

-----------------------------------------------------

Here are a couple of PUNY and O.Henry Museum related websites of interest:

http://punpunpun.com
http://www.austintexas.gov/department/o-henry-museum
https://www.facebook.com/groups/punoff/
https://www.facebook.com/PUNYPAGE/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O._Henry_Pun-Off

Here are the group e-mail addresses:

Post: main@puny.groups.io
Subscribe: main+subscribe@puny.groups.io
Unsubscribe: main+unsubscribe@puny.groups.io
Group Owner: main+owner@puny.groups.io
Help: main+help@puny.groups.io

=====================================================

V. Trademark and Copyright Information / End

-----------------------------------------------------

This FAQ created with VEDIT Pro (64-bit).
VEDIT is Copyright © 1990-2015 (probably later) Greenview Data, Inc.

All other trademarks used or referred to in this FAQ are the property of their respective owners.

Lee Jackson, PUNY group Administrangler
https://puny.groups.io/g/main/

And the winner is ....

Marilyn Van Driesen
 

Participants who finished were Lars Hanson, Jon Gearhart, Gary Hallock. Jim (no last name) was with us for a while, and Doug Spector at the end with an answer.  Since Lars finished first he will host the next Rogue Riddle.  During play Jon and Gary said no matter the ending, they would prefer not to host next week's riddle, so that worked out fine.      Next week will be #RogueRiddle 1034.  It's been fun working with all of you and thanks for working on it.  Stan would be proud. -- Marilyn

1.     What's the difference between a sweet-toothed grizzly and rabbit fur?

          A sweet-toothed grizzly is a honey bear while rabbit fur is __________   ________. 

          BUNNY HAIR

 

2.     What's the difference between where you shop for a toothbrush and a brainy missile?   

          You shop for a toothbrush in a dental mart while a brainy missile is a ____________  ________.  

            MENTAL DART

 

3.    What's the difference between an unwelcome party and one who smashes boxes?  

          An unwelcome party guest is a gate crasher while one who smashes boxes is a __________   ____________.

          CRATE GASHER

 

4.    What's the difference between a granny and a granary? 

          A granny is a born kin while a granary is a ________   ______

          CORN BIN

     

5.    What's the difference between an adorable glove and a silent baby cat?  

          An adorable glove is a cute mitten and a silent baby cat is a ________   ____________.

           MUTE KITTEN

          

6.    What's the difference between a rapidly moving feline and a clever rodent? 

          A rapidly moving feline is a running cat, while a clever rodent is a ______________   ______.  

           CUNNING RAT

7.    What's the difference between half a cleaning tool and a military father?  

          Half a cleaning tool is a partial mop while a military father is a _______   ______.  

            MARTIAL POP

8.    What's the difference between a web-spinning bibliophile and a swift cyclist?   

          A web-spinning bibliophile is a reading spider while a swift cyclist is a ________________   __________.

          SPEEDING RIDER      
   

9.    What's the difference between chilly lasses and blonde ringlets? 

          Chilly lasses are cold girls while blonde ringlets are ______   ________.   

           GOLD CURLS

          

10. What's the difference between a rundown hotel and wasp’s banner?

           A rundown hotel is a flea bag while a wasp’s banner is a ______   ________.   

            BEE FLAG  (but wasps are not bees)

11. What's the difference between where talking birds place their soda glasses and large pictures of vegetables? 

      Talking birds place their soda glasses on _____ _____while large pictures of vegetables are _____   _____.

            CARROT POSTERS

           

12. What's the difference between a light in a cave and a dance in a bar?

          One is a _______ in a _______; the other is a __________   in a  ________. 

        CAPER IN A TAVERN 

                     

13. What's the difference between an oak tree and a tight shoe?

          One makes ____________; the other makes ________ ________. 

           ACORNS / CORNS ACHE

 

14. What's the difference between a skilled marksman and the man who tends his targets? 

          One ________ the ________; the other __________  the   _________.   

            HITS THE MARK / MARKS THE HIT 

15. What's the difference between a well-brushed equine and rapid teaching?  

          A well-brushed equine is a __________ __________ while rapid teaching makes for a ______________  _____________. 

            CURRIED HORSE / HURRIED COURSE

 

16.  What's the difference between two pair of hosiery and a hurting vulpine?  

Two pairs of hosiery are __________ __________ while a hurting vulpine is a ________ ________. 

            FOUR SOCKS / SORE FOX

 

17. What's the difference between an ale container and a small insect?  

          An ale container is a ________   ________ while a small insect is a ________   ________.

          BEER MUG / MERE BUG

Rogue Riddle

Marilyn Van Driesen
 

I plan to shut down the riddle tomorrow noon barring interruptions here.  No one new has started it since yesterday.  Others made great headway, but are stuck, mostly on the last one.  If you decided to try it, there is still plenty of time left.

Send responses to merk@... by Tuesday midmorning if you intend to try it or finish what you've started.  Thanks to those who participated thus far. -- Marilyn

          A lashing monster serpent is a whipping dragon while a leaky cart is a dripping wagon

 

What's the difference between a jumping sorcerer and a crying reptile?   

          A jumping sorcerer is a leaping wizard while a crying reptile is a weeping lizard.

 

So … thanks for joining us … here we go ….

 

1.     What's the difference between  a sweet toothed grizzly and rabbit fur?

          A sweet toothed grizzly is a honey bear while rabbit fur is __________   ________. 

 

2.     What's the difference between where you shop for a toothbrush and a brainy missile?   

          You shop for a toothbrush in a dental mart while a brainy missile is a ____________  ________. 

 

3.    What's the difference between an unwelcome party and one who smashes boxes?  

          An unwelcome party guest is a gate crasher while one who smashes boxes is a __________   ____________.

 

4.    What's the difference between a granny and a granary? 

          A granny is a born kin while a granary is a ________   ______

 

5.    What's the difference between  an adorable glove and a silent baby cat?  

          An adorable glove is a cute mitten and a silent baby cat is a ________   ____________.

 

6.    What's the difference between a rapidly moving feline and a clever rodent? 

          A rapidly moving feline is a running cat, while a clever rodent is a ______________   ______.  

 

7.    What's the difference between half a cleaning tool and a military father?  

          Half a cleaning tool is a partial mop while a military father is a _______   ______.  

 

8.    What's the difference between a web-spinning bibliophile and a swift cyclist?   

          A web-spinning bibliophile is a reading spider while a swift cyclist is a ________________   __________.

 

9.    What's the difference between chilly lasses and blonde ringlets? 

          Chilly lasses are cold girls while blonde ringlets are ______   ________.   

 

10. What's the difference between a rundown hotel and wasp’s banner?

           A rundown hotel is a flea bag while a wasp’s banner is a ______   ________.   

 

11. What's the difference between where talking birds place their soda glasses and large pictures of vegetables? 

      Talking birds place their soda glasses on parrot coasters while large pictures of vegetables are _____   _____.

 

12. What's the difference between a light in a cave and a dance in a bar?

          One is a taper in a cavern; the other is a __________   _____   _____  ________. 

 

13. What's the difference between an oak tree and a tight shoe?

          One makes ____________; the other makes ________ ________. 

 

14. What's the difference between a skilled marksman and the man who tends his targets? 

          One ________ the ________; the other __________  the   _________.   

 

15. What's the difference between a well-brushed equine and rapid teaching?  

          A well-brushed equine is a __________ __________ while rapid teaching makes for a ______________  _____________. 

 

16.  What's the difference between two pair of hosiery and a hurting vulpine?  

Two pairs of hosiery are __________ __________ while a hurting vulpine is a ________ ________. 

 

17. What's the difference between an ale container and a small insect?  

          An ale container is a ________   ________ while a small insect is a ________   ________.

 

 

 

 

 

Send responses to merk@... by Wednesday noon.


The Rogue

Marilyn Van Driesen
 

Jim was off to a very good start, but fell asleep.

Lars worked at it like I do, plugging away bit by bit.  He's almost to the finish line.

Jon came out of nowhere this morning and is almost there, too, but does not want to host the rogue next week.

You guys are all terrific and thank you for participating.  Now you other people can sit home on a hot Sunday afternoon and come out of nowhere like Jon and blast your way through it.  Stan would be so proud of you all.

I thought sure I posted the Rogue at the PUNY, but Lars says not.  So sorry about that. 

Spoonerisms:  Send responses to merk@... by Tuesday noon.

Knock, knock.

Who’s there?

Possum.

Possum who?

Possum the riddles, please. 

Received from Stan Kegel.

----- 

A spoonerism is the transposition of initial or other sounds of words, usually by accident, as in a blushing crow for a crushing blow 

The term spoonerism was named after W.A. Spooner, an English clergyman noted for such slips of the tongue.  Now wouldn’t that be potentially embarrassing for a clergyman. 

Some book titles of Spoonerisms, “Runny Babbit” by Shel Silverstein.  Smart Feller Fart Smeller by John Agee

 

Here are examples of some spoonerisms.  In these examples, I have used italics for the last two words.  In the challenges below, some words are left out for you to find.  Toward the bottom, there are challenging ones with more blanks.  Of course, there’s lots of rhyming in the second line. 

 

What's the difference between a lashing monster and a leaky cart?  

          A lashing monster serpent is a whipping dragon while a leaky cart is a dripping wagon

 

What's the difference between a jumping sorcerer and a crying reptile?   

          A jumping sorcerer is a leaping wizard while a crying reptile is a weeping lizard.

 

So … thanks for joining us … here we go ….

 

1.     What's the difference between  a sweet toothed grizzly and rabbit fur?

          A sweet toothed grizzly is a honey bear while rabbit fur is __________   ________. 

 

2.     What's the difference between where you shop for a toothbrush and a brainy missile?   

          You shop for a toothbrush in a dental mart while a brainy missile is a ____________  ________. 

 

3.    What's the difference between an unwelcome party and one who smashes boxes?  

          An unwelcome party guest is a gate crasher while one who smashes boxes is a __________   ____________.

 

4.    What's the difference between a granny and a granary? 

          A granny is a born kin while a granary is a ________   ______

 

5.    What's the difference between  an adorable glove and a silent baby cat?  

          An adorable glove is a cute mitten and a silent baby cat is a ________   ____________.

 

6.    What's the difference between a rapidly moving feline and a clever rodent? 

          A rapidly moving feline is a running cat, while a clever rodent is a ______________   ______.  

 

7.    What's the difference between half a cleaning tool and a military father?  

          Half a cleaning tool is a partial mop while a military father is a _______   ______.  

 

8.    What's the difference between a web-spinning bibliophile and a swift cyclist?   

          A web-spinning bibliophile is a reading spider while a swift cyclist is a ________________   __________.

 

9.    What's the difference between chilly lasses and blonde ringlets? 

          Chilly lasses are cold girls while blonde ringlets are ______   ________.   

 

10. What's the difference between a rundown hotel and wasp’s banner?

           A rundown hotel is a flea bag while a wasp’s banner is a ______   ________.   

 

11. What's the difference between where talking birds place their soda glasses and large pictures of vegetables? 

      Talking birds place their soda glasses on parrot coasters while large pictures of vegetables are _____   _____.

 

12. What's the difference between a light in a cave and a dance in a bar?

          One is a taper in a cavern; the other is a __________   _____   _____  ________. 

 

13. What's the difference between an oak tree and a tight shoe?

          One makes ____________; the other makes ________ ________. 

 

14. What's the difference between a skilled marksman and the man who tends his targets? 

          One ________ the ________; the other __________  the   _________.   

 

15. What's the difference between a well-brushed equine and rapid teaching?  

          A well-brushed equine is a __________ __________ while rapid teaching makes for a ______________  _____________. 

 

16.  What's the difference between two pair of hosiery and a hurting vulpine?  

Two pairs of hosiery are __________ __________ while a hurting vulpine is a ________ ________. 

 

17. What's the difference between an ale container and a small insect?  

          An ale container is a ________   ________ while a small insect is a ________   ________.


Send responses to merk@... by Wednesday noon.


Re: possum

Marilyn Van Driesen
 

So cute, but work on the spoonerisms now.  I am disappointed at how few are trying. 

On Saturday, July 25, 2020, 04:13:26 PM CDT, portagecreek <gypsywagon@...> wrote:





Knock, knock.

Who’s there?

Possum.

Possum who?

Possum the riddles, please.

 

Marilyn

================

I guess you could say you’ll be publishing these Spoonerisms in memory of Stan Kegel possum-ously.

 

Jim

Re: possum

portagecreek
 




Knock, knock.

Who’s there?

Possum.

Possum who?

Possum the riddles, please.

 

Marilyn

================

I guess you could say you’ll be publishing these Spoonerisms in memory of Stan Kegel possum-ously.

 

Jim

_._,_._,_
Should we call 'em O'possums on this site?
GR