Date   

FSST #4 - Cats as Interior Decorators

bill crider
 

Because their cat used every piece of their wooden furniture to sharpen his claws, the hippy couple described their interior decor style using the popular phrase from a 1966 Simon and Garfunkel hit song. What was the phrase and the style the punned version described?


Send guesses to bill.crider at gmail.com.


Bingo for Bill on FSST #3

chasmwuk@...
 

Bill knew that if an author wanted to start a new paragraph on his/her story about cats, s/he would TABBY over five spaces.  Bill
has kindly agreed to host FSST #4.

Charles


Re: lovely example of Morris dancing

joseph h
 

Very interesting variation - much like square dancing in this form. But Morris Dancing is much more aggressive and normally all men with stout sticks which are clashed vigorously.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brkwZm6Ml74

This is much more like the traditonal Morris Dance.

Joseph

Wow--it's a whole choreographed thing, isn't it?! Thanks



 

Be sure to have the sound turned up.

Charles


Re: Morris dancing?

joseph h
 

It is very English and very quaint. The dancers wear bells, and there is another figure of some ominous creature that is effectively the fool - and money collector! It seems to me to have developed from training fighters in far distant days.

Joseph

Thanks. Oddly, although I never watch TV, I do know of Morris the cat. But I am totally unfamiliar with the term "Morris dancing." 

Cyn

= = = = =

 
Cyn,

    Morris the cat was featured in commercials.,

    Morris dancing thus is the answer to the type of dancing that famous cat would engage in.

    Play between the cat's name and a type of dancing.

    Aloha,

        Lars

===========================



On Tue, May 13, 2014 at 3:32 PM, Cynthia MacGregor cynthia@... [puny] <puny@...> wrote:
 
Isn't anyone going to answer my question as to what "Morris dancing" is a pun on?



--
    Aloha,

        Lars


name for cat FIDOs

James Ertner
 

You’re right, Lars. It would be a catastrophe and a cataclysm if we couldn't come up with a catalog of cat puns.

Jim
======================
 

Gary,

    The correct (according to several usage and style manuals) plural of an acronym is formed by adding apostrophe s ('s) at the end.

    Following that rule, "FIDO's" is the correct plural form.

    I suspect that over time, as Americans become increasingly ignorant of that usage, the usage may well change.

    As for "exhausting" cat puns, are we really so devoid of imagination?  Or perhaps does the subject of  cats offer a pawsity of puns?

    Aloha,

        Lars

==================

I will remain MEOWt on the subject.

Jim
=======================
 

What's with all the idle c(h)atter about cats? Don't you know you're merely spoiling all the good ideas for riddles!


Also I wish everyone would please stop passing along references to "cat FIDO's."  Beside the obliviously callous apostrophe abuse, these are "F-Riddles." Calling riddle from the new series a "cat FIDO" is akin to making reference to a "real fictional character." Just makes no sense to meow tall.

Gary Hallock
=======================
      

As an English teacher, I like the following oldie:


What's the difference between a cat and a comma?

A comma is a pause at the end of a clause, whereas a cat has its claws at the end of its paws.

Charles

=======================================

 
Joseph,
    Could have been petiatrists.  Or, even more appropriately, pawdiatrists.
    Might one consider the study of furniture in a house with cats scientific?   After all, that certainly would involve studying claws and effect.
Lars






FSST riddle #3

chasmwuk@...
 

FSST riddle #3:  If someone was going to write a story about cats, each time s/he wanted to begin a paragraph, s/he would 
   _ _ _ _ _ over five spaces. (Charles)

P.S.  I recall using this one several years ago in the only Punslinger event where I made it into the second round.  The topic was,
appropriately, "cats."  

Send your meows and purrs to chasmwuk@....

Charles


Re: Rogue Riddle #715 - Status

Lars Hanson
 

Cyn,

    Happy cooking!  It is a great way to relax -- and you get to eat the results!  ;-)

    Aloha,

        Lars

==================

On May 13, 2014 6:07 PM, "Cynthia MacGregor cynthia@... [puny]" <puny@...> wrote:
 

In answer: 

I'm no longer still exhausted but I'm certainly still swamped.

Heading back to the kitchen now and not sure how much longer I'll be online.

Cyn

= = = = =


All,

    The current standings are as follows:
  • Stan Kegel has just entered the fray with 41Ž2 quick kills (#1, #2, #6, and #8, with a partial on #4 and part of a sixth riddle), putting him in the lead over
  • Bill Crider, who has 11Ž2 kills ( #1, and a partial on #4)
    However, Stan has declined to host the next rogue, so right now it appears it will fall to Bill, unless there are other contestants. 

    Is everyone still exhausted from the Pun-Off?  ;-)

    Aloha,

        Lars

=====================================

All,

    So far Bill is the only contestant to tackle this week's Rogue Riddle.  He had one set of guesses, answering 1.5 riddles.

    The contest is still open for a bit, should anyone want to try to seize the honors.  To help with that, herewith some more clues.

==============

    Clue Set #3:
  • Letter counts have been provided for the remaining five riddles, below.  All the word counts and letter counts are now in place.  In addition, since each "headline" is split into two parts (generally for euphony),  virgule (/) has been added to indicate where the parts split.  The split actually help solve the riddle generally -- get one half and the other becomes more obvious.
  • Some more clues:
    •  1.  Sound-alikes.
    •  2.  Rough sound-alikes, also rearranging the same letters.
    •  3.  A type of race, not a car part.
    •  4.  Read the set-up - it is pretty precise.
    •  5.  A Spoonerism, with one two-letter word thrown in to make it a sensible sentence.
    •  6.  An almost perfect Spoonerism.
    •  7.  A car name.
    •  8.  Two pronunciations for the same word.
    •  9.  Read the set-up and think.
    • 10.  A bit esoteric (the real "4.0-buster" in the bunch).
    These should help most of you.

==============

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 
    Aloha,

        Lars

============================

All,

    Still no guesses on this week's Rogue Riddle.  Perhaps our key players are still traveling back from the Pun-Off. . . .

==============

    Clue Set #2:
  • Letter counts have been provided for the first five riddles, below.
==============

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 

    Have fun!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars

============================


All,

   So far, no guesses on this week's Rogue Riddle.  Most likely too many of you were occupied by the Annual Pun-Off Contest this week.

==============

    Clue Set #1:
  • When thinking about these "headlines," think of the tendency of many headline writers to use similar sounding phrases, such as "Resident President" or "Dog Hog" to head  story.  Headlines also may be puns or Spoonerisms.  
  • Look at each set-up and try to figure out why each is worded as it is.  In most cases, the set-up provides a valuable clue to at least one of the words being sought, and with one word the other word or words should become apparent.
==============

    This should help.

    Aloha,

        Lars

 

 

Rogue Riddle #715

Headliners

 

    Newspaper editors (remember them) in meeting a headline deadline often try for a catchy title designed to intrigue the reader.  Often such titles simply are catchy phrases, and often are puns.  The Economist weekly news magazine is famous for such headlines as “Out of luck” for an article about the Thai Prime Minister recently ousted by the court (Yingluck Shinawatra) or “In the scion’s den” for an article about the Indian elections.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle is in the spirit of such headlines.  For each of the ten stories below, suggest a catchy headline.  The first to headline each story correctly will be entitled to the honors.  If no one gets them all, the competitor with the most correct answers by Tuesday evening will be declared the winner.

 

    Here is what each story was about.  Word counts are provided.

 

1.  A punster was unable to find the Pun-Off venue, and was last seen wandering the streets.  (3 words -- 4, 2 / 6)

 

2.  Governor Perry has asked the Legislature for more revenue.  (Admittedly an unlikely event!)  (2 words -- 5 / 5)

 

3.  The National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) has just created a new race for cross dressers and female impersonators.  (3 words -- 7, 2 / 4)

 

4.  Recent investigations reveal that the Montgolfier brothers almost were beaten by a team of French-speaking Belgians.  (2 words -- 7 / 7)

 

5.  This girl only brings in dried herbaceous plants when it is misty.  (5 words -- 5, 4 / 2, 4, 4)

 

6.  The television anchor person provided a hint to the boss.  (3 words -- 10 / 4, 6)

 

7.  During World War II, a daring team of Allied saboteurs evaded capture by the Nazis by climbing down the Norwegian cliffs and leaving in a small boat.  (2 words -- 5 / 6)

 

8.  Fortune tellers broadcast their prediction:  “Seers (4 words -- 4, 1, 6 / 10)”

 

9.  A jazz fan was lucky enough to overtake Miss Fitzgerald in Texas.  (5 words -- 4, 4 / 2, 2, 4)

 

10.  A story about a man’s keyboard solo heard on a large Caribbean island.  (4 words -- 3, 8 / 2, 10)

 

 

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 

    Have fun!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars


Re: name for cat FIDOs

Lars Hanson
 

Gary,

    The correct (according to several usage and style manuals) plural of an acronym is formed by adding apostrophe s ('s) at the end.

    Following that rule, "FIDO's" is the correct plural form.

    I suspect that over time, as Americans become increasingly ignorant of that usage, the usage may well change.

    As for "exhausting" cat puns, are we really so devoid of imagination?  Or perhaps does the subject of  cats offer a pawsity of puns?

    Aloha,

        Lars

==================

   

On May 13, 2014 3:04 PM, "jde31459@... [puny]" <puny@...> wrote:
 

I will remain MEOWt on the subject.

Jim
=======================
 

What's with all the idle c(h)atter about cats? Don't you know you're merely spoiling all the good ideas for riddles!


Also I wish everyone would please stop passing along references to "cat FIDO's."  Beside the obliviously callous apostrophe abuse, these are "F-Riddles." Calling riddle from the new series a "cat FIDO" is akin to making reference to a "real fictional character." Just makes no sense to meow tall.

Gary Hallock


On May 13, 2014, at 1:39 PM, chasmwuk@... [puny] wrote:

 

As an English teacher, I like the following oldie:


What's the difference between a cat and a comma?

A comma is a pause at the end of a clause, whereas a cat has its claws at the end of its paws.

Charles


=======================================

 
Joseph,
    Could have been petiatrists.  Or, even more appropriately, pawdiatrists.
    Might one consider the study of furniture in a house with cats scientific?   After all, that certainly would involve studying claws and effect.
Lars





Re: Rogue Riddle #715 - Status

Cynthia MacGregor
 

In answer: 

I'm no longer still exhausted but I'm certainly still swamped.

Heading back to the kitchen now and not sure how much longer I'll be online.

Cyn

= = = = =


All,

    The current standings are as follows:
  • Stan Kegel has just entered the fray with 41Ž2 quick kills (#1, #2, #6, and #8, with a partial on #4 and part of a sixth riddle), putting him in the lead over
  • Bill Crider, who has 11Ž2 kills ( #1, and a partial on #4)
    However, Stan has declined to host the next rogue, so right now it appears it will fall to Bill, unless there are other contestants. 

    Is everyone still exhausted from the Pun-Off?  ;-)

    Aloha,

        Lars

=====================================

All,

    So far Bill is the only contestant to tackle this week's Rogue Riddle.  He had one set of guesses, answering 1.5 riddles.

    The contest is still open for a bit, should anyone want to try to seize the honors.  To help with that, herewith some more clues.

==============

    Clue Set #3:
  • Letter counts have been provided for the remaining five riddles, below.  All the word counts and letter counts are now in place.  In addition, since each "headline" is split into two parts (generally for euphony),  virgule (/) has been added to indicate where the parts split.  The split actually help solve the riddle generally -- get one half and the other becomes more obvious.
  • Some more clues:
    •  1.  Sound-alikes.
    •  2.  Rough sound-alikes, also rearranging the same letters.
    •  3.  A type of race, not a car part.
    •  4.  Read the set-up - it is pretty precise.
    •  5.  A Spoonerism, with one two-letter word thrown in to make it a sensible sentence.
    •  6.  An almost perfect Spoonerism.
    •  7.  A car name.
    •  8.  Two pronunciations for the same word.
    •  9.  Read the set-up and think.
    • 10.  A bit esoteric (the real "4.0-buster" in the bunch).
    These should help most of you.

==============

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 
    Aloha,

        Lars

============================

All,

    Still no guesses on this week's Rogue Riddle.  Perhaps our key players are still traveling back from the Pun-Off. . . .

==============

    Clue Set #2:
  • Letter counts have been provided for the first five riddles, below.
==============

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 

    Have fun!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars

============================


All,

   So far, no guesses on this week's Rogue Riddle.  Most likely too many of you were occupied by the Annual Pun-Off Contest this week.

==============

    Clue Set #1:
  • When thinking about these "headlines," think of the tendency of many headline writers to use similar sounding phrases, such as "Resident President" or "Dog Hog" to head  story.  Headlines also may be puns or Spoonerisms.  
  • Look at each set-up and try to figure out why each is worded as it is.  In most cases, the set-up provides a valuable clue to at least one of the words being sought, and with one word the other word or words should become apparent.
==============

    This should help.

    Aloha,

        Lars

 

 

Rogue Riddle #715

Headliners

 

    Newspaper editors (remember them) in meeting a headline deadline often try for a catchy title designed to intrigue the reader.  Often such titles simply are catchy phrases, and often are puns.  The Economist weekly news magazine is famous for such headlines as “Out of luck” for an article about the Thai Prime Minister recently ousted by the court (Yingluck Shinawatra) or “In the scion’s den” for an article about the Indian elections.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle is in the spirit of such headlines.  For each of the ten stories below, suggest a catchy headline.  The first to headline each story correctly will be entitled to the honors.  If no one gets them all, the competitor with the most correct answers by Tuesday evening will be declared the winner.

 

    Here is what each story was about.  Word counts are provided.

 

1.  A punster was unable to find the Pun-Off venue, and was last seen wandering the streets.  (3 words -- 4, 2 / 6)

 

2.  Governor Perry has asked the Legislature for more revenue.  (Admittedly an unlikely event!)  (2 words -- 5 / 5)

 

3.  The National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) has just created a new race for cross dressers and female impersonators.  (3 words -- 7, 2 / 4)

 

4.  Recent investigations reveal that the Montgolfier brothers almost were beaten by a team of French-speaking Belgians.  (2 words -- 7 / 7)

 

5.  This girl only brings in dried herbaceous plants when it is misty.  (5 words -- 5, 4 / 2, 4, 4)

 

6.  The television anchor person provided a hint to the boss.  (3 words -- 10 / 4, 6)

 

7.  During World War II, a daring team of Allied saboteurs evaded capture by the Nazis by climbing down the Norwegian cliffs and leaving in a small boat.  (2 words -- 5 / 6)

 

8.  Fortune tellers broadcast their prediction:  “Seers (4 words -- 4, 1, 6 / 10)”

 

9.  A jazz fan was lucky enough to overtake Miss Fitzgerald in Texas.  (5 words -- 4, 4 / 2, 2, 4)

 

10.  A story about a man’s keyboard solo heard on a large Caribbean island.  (4 words -- 3, 8 / 2, 10)

 

 

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 

    Have fun!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars


Rogue Riddle #715 - Status

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    The current standings are as follows:
  • Stan Kegel has just entered the fray with 4½ quick kills (#1, #2, #6, and #8, with a partial on #4 and part of a sixth riddle), putting him in the lead over
  • Bill Crider, who has 1½ kills ( #1, and a partial on #4)
    However, Stan has declined to host the next rogue, so right now it appears it will fall to Bill, unless there are other contestants. 

    Is everyone still exhausted from the Pun-Off?  ;-)

    Aloha,

        Lars

=====================================

All,

    So far Bill is the only contestant to tackle this week's Rogue Riddle.  He had one set of guesses, answering 1.5 riddles.

    The contest is still open for a bit, should anyone want to try to seize the honors.  To help with that, herewith some more clues.

==============

    Clue Set #3:
  • Letter counts have been provided for the remaining five riddles, below.  All the word counts and letter counts are now in place.  In addition, since each "headline" is split into two parts (generally for euphony),  virgule (/) has been added to indicate where the parts split.  The split actually help solve the riddle generally -- get one half and the other becomes more obvious.
  • Some more clues:
    •  1.  Sound-alikes.
    •  2.  Rough sound-alikes, also rearranging the same letters.
    •  3.  A type of race, not a car part.
    •  4.  Read the set-up - it is pretty precise.
    •  5.  A Spoonerism, with one two-letter word thrown in to make it a sensible sentence.
    •  6.  An almost perfect Spoonerism.
    •  7.  A car name.
    •  8.  Two pronunciations for the same word.
    •  9.  Read the set-up and think.
    • 10.  A bit esoteric (the real "4.0-buster" in the bunch).
    These should help most of you.

==============

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 
    Aloha,

        Lars

============================

All,

    Still no guesses on this week's Rogue Riddle.  Perhaps our key players are still traveling back from the Pun-Off. . . .

==============

    Clue Set #2:
  • Letter counts have been provided for the first five riddles, below.
==============

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 

    Have fun!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars

============================


All,

   So far, no guesses on this week's Rogue Riddle.  Most likely too many of you were occupied by the Annual Pun-Off Contest this week.

==============

    Clue Set #1:
  • When thinking about these "headlines," think of the tendency of many headline writers to use similar sounding phrases, such as "Resident President" or "Dog Hog" to head  story.  Headlines also may be puns or Spoonerisms.  
  • Look at each set-up and try to figure out why each is worded as it is.  In most cases, the set-up provides a valuable clue to at least one of the words being sought, and with one word the other word or words should become apparent.
==============

    This should help.

    Aloha,

        Lars

 

 

Rogue Riddle #715

Headliners

 

    Newspaper editors (remember them) in meeting a headline deadline often try for a catchy title designed to intrigue the reader.  Often such titles simply are catchy phrases, and often are puns.  The Economist weekly news magazine is famous for such headlines as “Out of luck” for an article about the Thai Prime Minister recently ousted by the court (Yingluck Shinawatra) or “In the scion’s den” for an article about the Indian elections.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle is in the spirit of such headlines.  For each of the ten stories below, suggest a catchy headline.  The first to headline each story correctly will be entitled to the honors.  If no one gets them all, the competitor with the most correct answers by Tuesday evening will be declared the winner.

 

    Here is what each story was about.  Word counts are provided.

 

1.  A punster was unable to find the Pun-Off venue, and was last seen wandering the streets.  (3 words -- 4, 2 / 6)

 

2.  Governor Perry has asked the Legislature for more revenue.  (Admittedly an unlikely event!)  (2 words -- 5 / 5)

 

3.  The National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) has just created a new race for cross dressers and female impersonators.  (3 words -- 7, 2 / 4)

 

4.  Recent investigations reveal that the Montgolfier brothers almost were beaten by a team of French-speaking Belgians.  (2 words -- 7 / 7)

 

5.  This girl only brings in dried herbaceous plants when it is misty.  (5 words -- 5, 4 / 2, 4, 4)

 

6.  The television anchor person provided a hint to the boss.  (3 words -- 10 / 4, 6)

 

7.  During World War II, a daring team of Allied saboteurs evaded capture by the Nazis by climbing down the Norwegian cliffs and leaving in a small boat.  (2 words -- 5 / 6)

 

8.  Fortune tellers broadcast their prediction:  “Seers (4 words -- 4, 1, 6 / 10)”

 

9.  A jazz fan was lucky enough to overtake Miss Fitzgerald in Texas.  (5 words -- 4, 4 / 2, 2, 4)

 

10.  A story about a man’s keyboard solo heard on a large Caribbean island.  (4 words -- 3, 8 / 2, 10)

 

 

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 

    Have fun!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars


Re: lovely example of Morris dancing

Cynthia MacGregor
 

I thought Morris was the red planet. I didn't planet that way, though. It's also a system of dots and dashes in code. And code is what the temperature was in my airplane Sunday. If you sit in First Class, it's not an airplane; it's an airfancy. I don't fancy flying again any too soon, though. ("Too soon" is located in Aridzona.) But Zona or later this string of puns has to come to an end.

Cyn

= = =  =

A little is good, but Morris better.

Jim
========================
 

Wow--it's a whole choreographed thing, isn't it?! Thanks

Cyn
=========================     


Be sure to have the sound turned up.

Charles


lovely example of Morris dancing

James Ertner
 

A little is good, but Morris better.

Jim
========================
 

Wow--it's a whole choreographed thing, isn't it?! Thanks

Cyn
=========================     


Be sure to have the sound turned up.

Charles



Re: lovely example of Morris dancing

Cynthia MacGregor
 

Wow--it's a whole choreographed thing, isn't it?! Thanks



 


Be sure to have the sound turned up.

Charles


lovely example of Morris dancing

chasmwuk@...
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoKvMqQXRRo

Be sure to have the sound turned up.

Charles


Re: FSST #1, hint #1

Cynthia MacGregor
 

Thanks.

Cyn


 

OK, sorry!  Morris dancing is an ancient English folk dance often accompanied by the dancers hitting

one another's sticks or holding objects and interlocking them with those of other dancers.

Charles




 
I was not challenging whether it was a pun. I was merely asking what it was a pun ON.

I take it from your reply that the target phrase is also "Morris dancing"? Is that correct?

Pardon my ignorance. It's a totally new term to me.

Cyn

Here again we get into the endless debate as to what constitutes a pun.  A word with two meanings is,
in my humble opinion, a pun.  We have Morris as in the name of a famous cat.  We also have Morris as
in "Morris folk dancing."  Now I'd have to research the etymology of "Morris" in the folk dancing sense,
but it definitely has nothing to do with Morris the cat.

Take, for example, this oldie:

A woman is pushing her toddler in a stroller and bumps into an old friend.
Friend:  Is that your little boy?
Woman:  Yes, that's him.
Friend:  How old is he?
Woman:  Six months.
Friend:  Is he a good boy?
Woman:  Yes.
Friend:  Is she spoiled?
Woman:  No, he always smells that way.

"Spoiled" has two obvious meanings here:  a) rotten, sour   b) undisciplined

Charles  


========================================

 
I'm lost. What is Morris dancing a pun on? I realize I was meowing up the wrong tree by trying to work out an answer that involved "Felix." (The other famous cat who came to my mind besides Felix was the Cheshire cat.) But what in the world is "Morris dancing" a pun on?
Cyn

= = = = =

Gary bingoes with Morris Dancing and will host FSST #2.

Charles


=============== =============================

 
Lars and Joseph have both bingoed, but neither cares to host.  I'll keep the riddle open until I get both a correct answer and a willingness to host FSST #2.

FSST riddle #1:  If a famous cat decided to try his hand at English folk dancing, what type of dancing might he engage in?
Send your meows and purrs to chasmwuk@....

Hint #1:  (actually two hints for the price of one)   This famous feline, having finished off a big dish of 9Lives cat food, might say "bring me a stick and I'll work off some of these calories by doing some folk dancing."

Charles


Re: FSST #1, hint #1

Lars Hanson
 

Charles,

    It was not  a matter of "not caring to host."  It was a matter of having been tied up until just now.  Had I agreed to host, I would have delayed the next FSST by several hours  Hence the demurral.

    Aloha,

        Lars

===========================



On Tue, May 13, 2014 at 2:33 PM, chasmwuk@... [puny] <puny@...> wrote:
 

Lars and Joseph have both bingoed, but neither cares to host.  I'll keep the riddle open until I get both a correct answer and a willingness to host FSST #2.


FSST riddle #1:  If a famous cat decided to try his hand at English folk dancing, what type of dancing might he engage in?
Send your meows and purrs to chasmwuk@....

Hint #1:  (actually two hints for the price of one)   This famous feline, having finished off a big dish of 9Lives cat food, might say "bring me a stick and I'll work off some of these calories by doing some folk dancing."

Charles




--
    Aloha,

        Lars


Re: Morris dancing?

Cynthia MacGregor
 

Thanks. Oddly, although I never watch TV, I do know of Morris the cat. But I am totally unfamiliar with the term "Morris dancing." 

Cyn

= = = = =

 

Cyn,

    Morris the cat was featured in commercials.,

    Morris dancing thus is the answer to the type of dancing that famous cat would engage in.

    Play between the cat's name and a type of dancing.

    Aloha,

        Lars

===========================



On Tue, May 13, 2014 at 3:32 PM, Cynthia MacGregor cynthia@... [puny] <puny@...> wrote:
 

Isn't anyone going to answer my question as to what "Morris dancing" is a pun on?




--
    Aloha,

        Lars


Re: FSST #1, hint #1

chasmwuk@...
 

OK, sorry!  Morris dancing is an ancient English folk dance often accompanied by the dancers hitting
one another's sticks or holding objects and interlocking them with those of other dancers.

Charles




-----Original Message-----
From: Cynthia MacGregor cynthia@... [puny]
To: PUNY
Sent: Tue, May 13, 2014 2:36 pm
Subject: Re: [puny] FSST #1, hint #1

 
I was not challenging whether it was a pun. I was merely asking what it was a pun ON.

I take it from your reply that the target phrase is also "Morris dancing"? Is that correct?

Pardon my ignorance. It's a totally new term to me.

Cyn

Here again we get into the endless debate as to what constitutes a pun.  A word with two meanings is,
in my humble opinion, a pun.  We have Morris as in the name of a famous cat.  We also have Morris as
in "Morris folk dancing."  Now I'd have to research the etymology of "Morris" in the folk dancing sense,
but it definitely has nothing to do with Morris the cat.

Take, for example, this oldie:

A woman is pushing her toddler in a stroller and bumps into an old friend.
Friend:  Is that your little boy?
Woman:  Yes, that's him.
Friend:  How old is he?
Woman:  Six months.
Friend:  Is he a good boy?
Woman:  Yes.
Friend:  Is she spoiled?
Woman:  No, he always smells that way.

"Spoiled" has two obvious meanings here:  a) rotten, sour   b) undisciplined

Charles  


========================================

 
I'm lost. What is Morris dancing a pun on? I realize I was meowing up the wrong tree by trying to work out an answer that involved "Felix." (The other famous cat who came to my mind besides Felix was the Cheshire cat.) But what in the world is "Morris dancing" a pun on?
Cyn

= = = = =

Gary bingoes with Morris Dancing and will host FSST #2.

Charles


=============== =============================

 
Lars and Joseph have both bingoed, but neither cares to host.  I'll keep the riddle open until I get both a correct answer and a willingness to host FSST #2.

FSST riddle #1:  If a famous cat decided to try his hand at English folk dancing, what type of dancing might he engage in?
Send your meows and purrs to chasmwuk@....

Hint #1:  (actually two hints for the price of one)   This famous feline, having finished off a big dish of 9Lives cat food, might say "bring me a stick and I'll work off some of these calories by doing some folk dancing."

Charles


Re: Morris dancing?

Lars Hanson
 

Cyn,

    Morris the cat was featured in commercials.,

    Morris dancing thus is the answer to the type of dancing that famous cat would engage in.

    Play between the cat's name and a type of dancing.

    Aloha,

        Lars

===========================



On Tue, May 13, 2014 at 3:32 PM, Cynthia MacGregor cynthia@... [puny] <puny@...> wrote:
 

Isn't anyone going to answer my question as to what "Morris dancing" is a pun on?




--
    Aloha,

        Lars


Rogue Riddle #715 - Status & Clue Set #3

Lars Hanson
 

All,

    So far Bill is the only contestant to tackle this week's Rogue Riddle.  He had one set of guesses, answering 1.5 riddles.

    The contest is still open for a bit, should anyone want to try to seize the honors.  To help with that, herewith some more clues.

==============

    Clue Set #3:
  • Letter counts have been provided for the remaining five riddles, below.  All the word counts and letter counts are now in place.  In addition, since each "headline" is split into two parts (generally for euphony),  virgule (/) has been added to indicate where the parts split.  The split actually help solve the riddle generally -- get one half and the other becomes more obvious.
  • Some more clues:
    •  1.  Sound-alikes.
    •  2.  Rough sound-alikes, also rearranging the same letters.
    •  3.  A type of race, not a car part.
    •  4.  Read the set-up - it is pretty precise.
    •  5.  A Spoonerism, with one two-letter word thrown in to make it a sensible sentence.
    •  6.  An almost perfect Spoonerism.
    •  7.  A car name.
    •  8.  Two pronunciations for the same word.
    •  9.  Read the set-up and think.
    • 10.  A bit esoteric (the real "4.0-buster" in the bunch).
    These should help most of you.

==============

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 
    Aloha,

        Lars

============================

All,

    Still no guesses on this week's Rogue Riddle.  Perhaps our key players are still traveling back from the Pun-Off. . . .

==============

    Clue Set #2:
  • Letter counts have been provided for the first five riddles, below.
==============

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 

    Have fun!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars

============================


All,

   So far, no guesses on this week's Rogue Riddle.  Most likely too many of you were occupied by the Annual Pun-Off Contest this week.

==============

    Clue Set #1:
  • When thinking about these "headlines," think of the tendency of many headline writers to use similar sounding phrases, such as "Resident President" or "Dog Hog" to head  story.  Headlines also may be puns or Spoonerisms.  
  • Look at each set-up and try to figure out why each is worded as it is.  In most cases, the set-up provides a valuable clue to at least one of the words being sought, and with one word the other word or words should become apparent.
==============

    This should help.

    Aloha,

        Lars

 

 

Rogue Riddle #715

Headliners

 

    Newspaper editors (remember them) in meeting a headline deadline often try for a catchy title designed to intrigue the reader.  Often such titles simply are catchy phrases, and often are puns.  The Economist weekly news magazine is famous for such headlines as “Out of luck” for an article about the Thai Prime Minister recently ousted by the court (Yingluck Shinawatra) or “In the scion’s den” for an article about the Indian elections.

 

    This week’s Rogue Riddle is in the spirit of such headlines.  For each of the ten stories below, suggest a catchy headline.  The first to headline each story correctly will be entitled to the honors.  If no one gets them all, the competitor with the most correct answers by Tuesday evening will be declared the winner.

 

    Here is what each story was about.  Word counts are provided.

 

1.  A punster was unable to find the Pun-Off venue, and was last seen wandering the streets.  (3 words -- 4, 2 / 6)

 

2.  Governor Perry has asked the Legislature for more revenue.  (Admittedly an unlikely event!)  (2 words -- 5 / 5)

 

3.  The National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) has just created a new race for cross dressers and female impersonators.  (3 words -- 7, 2 / 4)

 

4.  Recent investigations reveal that the Montgolfier brothers almost were beaten by a team of French-speaking Belgians.  (2 words -- 7 / 7)

 

5.  This girl only brings in dried herbaceous plants when it is misty.  (5 words -- 5, 4 / 2, 4, 4)

 

6.  The television anchor person provided a hint to the boss.  (3 words -- 10 / 4, 6)

 

7.  During World War II, a daring team of Allied saboteurs evaded capture by the Nazis by climbing down the Norwegian cliffs and leaving in a small boat.  (2 words -- 5 / 6)

 

8.  Fortune tellers broadcast their prediction:  “Seers (4 words -- 4, 1, 6 / 10)”

 

9.  A jazz fan was lucky enough to overtake Miss Fitzgerald in Texas.  (5 words -- 4, 4 / 2, 2, 4)

 

10.  A story about a man’s keyboard solo heard on a large Caribbean island.  (4 words -- 3, 8 / 2, 10)

 

 

    PLEASE REMEMBER:  DO NOT HIT REPLY!

 

    Submit your guesses, gaffes, and wags directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...

 

    Feel free to send swag along as well!

 

    Have fun!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars

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