Date   

Re: Rogue Riddle 1046 - Winner Declared and Answers Revealed

Lars Hanson
 

All, 

    Correction of typo on the answer to riddle 16.

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================
All,
 
     Gregg is this week’s clear winner, having solved all but one of the riddles.  Gregg will host Rogue Riddle #1047 next week.  The final standings are:
 
Gregg (95%) – 19 kills (all but 4)
 
Adam (70%) –14 kills (1, 2, 5-14, 17, 20)
 
Gary H (47.5%) – 9 kills (2, 3, 6, 9, 11-14, 17) plus a partial (5)
 
Jim (42.5%) -- 8 kills  (1, 9, 11-16) plus one partial (5)
 

Lila (37.5%) – 7 kills (2, 3, 9, 11-14) plus one partial (5)

 
    The current riddle status is as follows:
 
5 correct – 5:  9, 11, 12, 13, 14
4 correct – 1:  2
3 correct – 5:   1, 3, 5, 6, 17
2 correct – 6: 7, 8, 10, 15, 16, 20
1 correct – 2: 18, 19
0 correct – 1:  4
 

No guesses –1:  4

 
Hint:
 
    Not all cities referred to are in the United States, but almost all are well known.  (#19 may not be as well known, to be spacific.) – Note the spelling in this hint.  It was not an accident but a clue to the location of the cities in riddles 17, 18, and 19.  They all are in the Pacific.
 
     And now for the reveal.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri
 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  
 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 
Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?
A:  GREECE / GREASE

  

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:
  • Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are not Spoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.)
  • The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.
      COTTON / CAUGHT ON
 
2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.
      TOKYO / KYOTO
      The characters, though different, actually are pronounced the same, but in reversed order, so it might well be considered a Japanese Spoonerism. 
 
3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.
      TEA BAR / T-BAR
 
4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 
      RE-LIE-ABLE SOURCES / RELIABLE SOURCES 
      RELAY-ABLE SOURCES might also have been accepted.
 
5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.
      JACKET / JACK-ETTE
 
6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.
      MA’S COW / MOSCOW
 
7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?
      FAKE EYELASHES
      FALSE EYELASHES also would have been acceptable.
 
8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?
      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.
      HOUSE OF LORDS / LOUSE OF HORDES
 
9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?
      WASHINgTON / WASHING  TON
 
10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?
        ELECTILE DYSFUNCTION
 
11.  This clothing item sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.
        STOCKING / STOCKING
 
12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?
        ALBANY / ALL BENNY
 
13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.
        A SALTED / ASSAULTED
 
14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.
        THAILAND / TIE LAND
 
15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.
        PARKA / PARKER (or, as Jim had it, PARKAH)
 
16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?
        MINNEAPOLIS / MINI-APPLES

 
17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.
        CANBERRA / CAN BEARER
 
18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.
        WELLINGTON / TELLING ONE
 
19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 
        APIAN / APIAN
 
20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.
        SLICKER / SLICKER
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 
 
    Thank you all for playing this week!

    Take it away, Gregg, with Rogue Riddle #1047 next week!
 
    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 - Winner Declared and Answers Revealed

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

     Gregg is this week’s clear winner, having solved all but one of the riddles.  Gregg will host Rogue Riddle #1047 next week.  The final standings are:

 

Gregg (95%) – 19 kills (all but 4)

 

Adam (70%) –14 kills (1, 2, 5-14, 17, 20)

 

Gary H (47.5%) – 9 kills (2, 3, 6, 9, 11-14, 17) plus a partial (5)

 

Jim (42.5%) -- 8 kills  (1, 9, 11-16) plus one partial (5)

 

Lila (37.5%) – 7 kills (2, 3, 9, 11-14) plus one partial (5)

 

    The current riddle status is as follows:

 

5 correct – 5:  9, 11, 12, 13, 14

4 correct – 1:  2

3 correct – 5:   1, 3, 5, 6, 17

2 correct – 6: 7, 8, 10, 15, 16, 20

1 correct – 2: 18, 19

0 correct – 1:  4

 

No guesses –1:  4

 

Hint:

 

    Not all cities referred to are in the United States, but almost all are well known.  (#19 may not be as well known, to be spacific.) – Note the spelling in this hint.  It was not an accident but a clue to the location of the cities in riddles 17, 18, and 19.  They all are in the Pacific.

 

     And now for the reveal.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  

    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

  • Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are not Spoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.)
  • The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

      COTTON / CAUGHT ON

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

      TOKYO / KYOTO

      The characters, though different, actually are pronounced the same, but in reversed order, so it might well be considered a Japanese Spoonerism. 

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

      TEA BAR / T-BAR

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

      RE-LIE-ABLE SOURCES / RELIABLE SOURCES 

      RELAY-ABLE SOURCES might also have been accepted.

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

      JACKET / JACK-ETTE

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

      MA’S COW / MOSCOW

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

      FAKE EYELASHES

      FALSE EYELASHES also would have been acceptable.

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.

      HOUSE OF LORDS / LOUSE OF HORDES

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

      WASHINgTON / WASHING  TON

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

        ELECTILE DYSFUNCTION

 

11.  This clothing item sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

        STOCKING / STOCKING

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

        ALBANY / ALL BENNY

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

        A SALTED / ASSAULTED

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

        THAILAND / TIE LAND

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

        PARKA / PARKER (or, as Jim had it, PARKAH)

 

16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?

        MINNEAPOLIS / MINN-APPLES

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

        CANBERRA / CAN BEARER

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

        WELLINGTON / TELLING ONE

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

        APIAN / APIAN

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

        SLICKER / SLICKER

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    Thank you all for playing this week!


    Take it away, Gregg, with Rogue Riddle #1047 next week!

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 -- Clue Set 5 -- #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Overnight Gregg has made admirable progress on this week’s Rogue Riddle, having solved all but four of the riddles.  Our Learless Feeder, Gary H. jetted in this morning with 9 clean kills and a partial.  Meanwhile Adam, Jim and Lila have been adding to their scores. The current standings are:

 

Gregg (80%) – 16 kills (1-3, 5, 6, 8-13, 15-18,  20)

 

Adam (70%) –14 kills (1, 2, 5-14, 17, 20)

 

Gary H (47.5%) – 9 kills (2, 3, 6, 9, 11-14, 17) plus a partial (5)

 

Jim (42.5%) -- 8 kills  (1, 9, 11-16) plus one partial (5)

 

Lila (37.5%) – 7 kills (2, 3, 9, 11-14) plus one partial (5)

 

    The current riddle status is as follows:

 

5 correct – 4:  9, 11, 12, 13

4 correct – 2:  2, 14

3 correct – 5:   1, 3, 5, 6, 17

2 correct – 5: 8, 10, 15, 16, 20

1 correct – 2: 7, 18

0 correct – 2:  4, 19

 

No guesses –1:  4

 

Hint:

 

    Not all cities referred to are in the United States, but almost all are well known.  (#19 may not be as well known, to be spacific.)

 

     Herewith another set of clues:

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the second five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #3:  Letter counts for the third five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #4:  Letter counts for the last five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #5:  Clues for the two unsolved riddles are included below.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

  • Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are not Spoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.)
  • The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

      (6 / 6, 2)

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 1-3)

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

      (2-3-4, 7 / 8, 7)

      This also can be seen as a news show on television.

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

      (6 / 4-4)

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

      (2’1, 3 / 6)

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

      (4, 9)

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.

      (5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 6)

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

      (10 / 7, 3)

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

        (8, 11)

 

11.  This clothing items sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

        (8)

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

        (6 / 3, 5)

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

        (1, 6 / 9)

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

        (8 / 3, 4)

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

        (5 / 6)

 

16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?

        (11 / 4-6)

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

        (8 / 3, 6)

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

        (10 / 7, 3)

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

        (5 / 5)

        This one requires some more scouting about than most have given it.  The answer must be an adjective.

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

        (7 / 7)

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be certain you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...


    To avoid public guesses (guesses posted to the PUNY list instead of guesses sent to the host), please ensure your guesses are addressed to me at the address above.

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 -- Clue Set 4 -- #Rogue Riddle #rogue

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    There has been a flurry of activity this evening.  Lila now has jumped in with 7 clean kills and a partial.  Meanwhile Adam, Jim and Gregg have been adding to their scores. The current standings are:

 

Adam (70%) –14 kills (1, 2, 5-14, 17, 20)

 

Gregg (67.50%) – 13 kills (1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 20) plus one partials (6)

 

Jim (40%) -- 7 kills  (12-14, 16) plus two partials (1, 5)

 

Lila (37.5%) – 7 kills (2, 3, 9, 11-14) plus one partial (5)

 

    The current riddle status is as follows:

 

4 correct – 4:  9, 11, 12, 13

3 correct – 3:   2, 5, 14

2 correct – 7:   1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 16, 20

1 correct – 3:   6, 7, 17

0 correct – 3:  4, 18, 19

 

No guesses –1:  4

 

Hint:

  • Not all cities referred to are in the United States, but almost all are well known.  (#19 may not be as well known, to be spacific.)

 

     In an effort to stir some activity, herewith another set of clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the second five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #3:  Letter counts for the third five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #4:  Letter counts for the last five riddles are provided below.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

  • Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are not Spoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.)
  • The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK. 

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

      (6 / 6, 2)

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 1-3)

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

      (2-3-4, 7 / 8, 7)

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

      (6 / 4-4)

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

      (2’1, 3 / 6)

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

      (4, 9)

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.

      (5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 6)

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

      (10 / 7, 3)

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

        (8, 11)

 

11.  This clothing items sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

        (8)

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

        (6 / 3, 5)

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

        (1, 6 / 9)

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

        (8 / 3, 4)

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

        (5 / 6)

 

16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?

        (11 / 4-6)

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

        (8 / 3, 6)

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

        (10 / 7, 3)

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

        (5 / 5)

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

        (7 / 7)

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be certain you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...


    To avoid public guesses (guesses posted to the PUNY list instead of guesses sent to the host), please ensure your guesses are addressed to me at the address above.

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 - Clue Set 3 -- #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Gregg now has jumped in with 9 clean kills and three partials on the first go.  Adam remains at 6 kills, followed by Jim with 4 kills.  The current standings are:

 

Gregg (55%) –9 kills (1-3, 5, 11-13, 15, 20) plus three partials (6, 8, 16)

 

Adam (30%) – 6 kills (1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 20)

 

Jim (20%) -- 4 kills  (12-14, 16)

 

    The current riddle status is as follows:

 

2 correct – 6:   1, 2, 5, 12, 13, 20

1 correct – 7:   3, 6, 8, 11, 14, 15, 16

0 correct – 7:  4, 7, 9, 10, 17, 18, 19

 

No guesses –1:  4

 

Hint:

  • Not all cities referred to are in the United States, but almost all are well known.  (#19 may not be as well known, to be spacific.)

 

     Herewith another set of clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the second five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #3:  Letter counts for the third five riddles are provided below.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

  • Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are not Spoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.)
  • The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

      (6 / 6, 2)

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 1-3)

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

      (2-3-4, 7 / 8, 7)

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

      (6 / 4-4)

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

      (2’1, 3 / 6)

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

      (4, 9)

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.

      (5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 6)

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

      (10 / 7, 3)

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

        (8, 11)

 

11.  This clothing items sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

        (8)

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

        (6 / 3, 5)

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

        (1, 6 / 9)

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

        (8 / 3, 4)

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

        (5 / 6)

 

16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be certain you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...


    To avoid public guesses (guesses posted to the PUNY list instead of guesses sent to the host), please ensure your guesses are addressed to me at the address above.

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 - Clue Set 3 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    All remains quiet on the Roguish front.  Adam retains the lead with 6 kills, followed by Jim with 4 kills.

 

     In an effort to stir some activity, herewith another set of clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the second five riddles are provided below.

 

Clue Set #3:  Letter counts for the third five riddles are provided below.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:

 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

  • Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are not Spoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.

  • The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

      (6 / 6, 2)

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 1-3)

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

      (2-3-4, 7 / 8, 7)

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

      (6 / 4-4)

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

      (2’1, 3 / 6)

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

      (4, 9)

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.

      (5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 6)

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

      (10 / 7, 3)

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

        (8, 11)

 

11.  This clothing items sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

        (8)

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

        (6 / 3, 5)

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

        (1, 6 / 9)

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

        (8 / 3, 4)

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

        (5 / 6)

 

16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be certain you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...


    To avoid public guesses (guesses posted to the PUNY list instead of guesses sent to the host), please ensure your guesses are addressed to me at the address above.


    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 - Clue Set 2 - #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Since the initial flurry of activity – nothing.  Has everyone suddenly gone quiet for the evening?  ;-)

 

     In an effort to stir some activity, herewith another set of clues.

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are provided below.

 

 

Clue Set #2:  Letter counts for the second five riddles are provided below.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

 

Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are notSpoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.

 

The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.

 

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

      (6 / 6, 2)

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 1-3)

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

      (2-3-4, 7 / 8, 7)

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

      (6 / 4-4)

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

      (2’1, 3 / 6)

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

      (4, 9)

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.

      (5, 2, 5 / 5, 2, 6)

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

      (10 / 7, 3)

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

        (8, 11)

 

11.  This clothing items sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

 

16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be certain you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...


    To avoid public guesses (guesses posted to the PUNY list instead of guesses sent to the host), please ensure your guesses are addressed to me at the address above.

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 - Status and Clue Set 1 - CORRECTED COPY -- #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    The test is over!  This time the letter counts are included!

 

    Adam gets credit for being the very first out of the blocks – his first guesses arrived only 11 minutes after this week’s Rogue Riddle was launched!  He quickly solved six of the riddles.  Jim Ertner also has entered the fray with four bingos.  Anyone else out there?

 

    Jim pointed out an embarrassing error in question 16, so that has been corrected, as well as a few minor typographical errors.

 

    Since we started late this week, here is the first clue set:

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are provided below.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

 

Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are notSpoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.

 

The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.

 

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

      (6 / 6, 2)

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

      (3, 3 / 1-3)

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

      (2-3-4, 7 / 8, 7)

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

      (6 / 4-4)

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

 

11.  This clothing items sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

 

16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be certain you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...


    To avoid public guesses (guesses posted to the PUNY list instead of guesses sent to the host), please ensure your guesses are addressed to me at the address above.

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 - Status and Clue Set 1 -- #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Adam gets credit for being the very first out of the blocks – his first guesses arrived only 11 minutes after this week’s Rogue Riddle was launched!  He quickly solved six of the riddles.  Jim Ertner also has entered the fray with four bingos.  Anyone else out there?

 

    Jim pointed out an embarrassing error in question 16, so that has been corrected, as well as a few minor typographical errors.

 

    Since we started late this week, here is the first clue set:

 

Clue Set #1:  Letter counts for the first five riddles are provided below.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

  • Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are notSpoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.

  • The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.

     The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while the other is the BLANK.

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

 

11.  This clothing items sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

 

16.  Was this Midwest city named for small fruits?

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be certain you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...


    To avoid public guesses (guesses posted to the PUNY list instead of guesses sent to the host), please ensure your guesses are addressed to me at the address above.

 

    Aloha,

        Lars

=================================


Rogue Riddle 1046 - Another Potpourri -- #RogueRiddle

Lars Hanson
 

All,

 

    Oddly enough, despite the isolation, it seems that time at home is at a premium, so I am a bit late in getting this week’s Rogue Riddle out.  My apologies.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 
Rogue Riddle #1046
Yet Another Potpourri

 
    A hodge-podge of riddles this week.  A bit of something for everyone.  

 
    As usual, this week’s Rogue Riddle consists of twenty riddles.  Each riddle has two answers which sound similar.  Both answers are required for full credit.  (There are exceptions – riddles 7, 10, 11, 19, and 20 have one-word answers.) Most of these are very easy, but there are one or two “4.0 busters” in the mix.
  
   Example:
 

Q:  Though I may sound like something for an axle, actually I am a country.  What am I?

A:  GREECE / GREASE

  
    As always, effort has gone into the setup wording to provide necessary clues.  Please note the following:

  • Contrary to my usual practice, most riddles of the form “What is the difference between ...?” are not Spoonerisms, but homophones.  (But one or two Spoonerisms are included.

  • The work BLANK may represent one or more words.  It is up to you, the solver, to determine how many words replace the BLANK.
    The riddle will until 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.  As usual, the first person to solve all the riddles will be declared the winner and will host Rogue Riddle 1047 next week.  If no one has solved all the riddles by 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, the one with the most correct answers will be declared the winner.
 
    Now, on to the riddles.
 
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

1.  It sounds as though this fabric has become all the rage – it seems BLANK has BLANK.

 

2.  This Japanese city sounds like a spoonerism of another Japanese city.

 

3.  What beverage tasting place sounds like a ski lift?  One is a BLANK while the other is a BLANK.

 

4.  What might one deceptively call originators of oft-cited conspiracy theories? 

 

5.  This outerwear sounds like a small device for raising a car.

 

6.  It sounds like the cause of (in)famous Chicago fire was Russian.

 

7.  Could these feminine cosmetic attachments be considered batting equipment?

 

8.  What is the difference between a section of Parliament and a widespread pest?

      One is the BLANK, while te other is the BLANK.

 

9.  What city sounds like a heavy load for the laundress?

 

10.  What term might be applied to a poorly run democratic process?

 

11.  This clothing items sounds like a task for a grocery store employee.

 

12.  What capital city sounds as though it is devoted exclusively to comedian Jack?

 

13.  For sure this peanut was attacked – after all, it was BLANK.

 

14.  What is the difference between this nation and one devoted to cravats?  One is BLANK, and the other might be called BLANK.

 

15.  This outerwear sounds like a Boston party valet.

 

16.  Was this capital city named for small fruits?

 

17.  What is the difference between this capital city and someone bringing a tin of soup?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

18.  What is the difference between this capital and a tattler?  One is BLANK and the other is a BLANK.

 

19.  Why might an inhabitant of this capital be confused with bees?  Both are BLANK. 

 

20.  This clothing item sounds more slippery.

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> 

 

    As always, it would be great to see some new faces this week!  

 

    Please remember to ensure your answers are directed to me.  You should be able just to hit “Reply” (thanks, Norm!),  but to be certain you may address all guesses, surmises, suppositions, estimates, conjectures, SWAG’s, stabs, pokes, and other such directly to me at:

 

parkersan2001@...


    To avoid public guesses (guesses posted to the PUNY list instead of guesses sent to the host), please ensure your guesses are addressed to me at the address above.

 

    Aloha,

 

        Lars

 


Rogue Riddle 1046 — Warning

Lars Hanson
 

All,

Rogue Riddle 1046 should appear by noon EDT today.

Aloha,

Lars

======================


Punniest of Show - Never too late!

gary hallock
 

Despite the word-wide PUNdemic, our 43rd annual O.Henry Pun-Off World Championships could not be stopped. Like virtually everything else on this crazy COVID planet, it’s happening on-line like everything else this year. The good news is that you all have a chance to participate this year, starting with the PUNNIEST OF SHOW. All 32 contestants (including several from this group) have submitted a 2 minute video of their best scripted performance. If you are quick on the trigger you still have a full day to watch and vote for your favorite presentation. That vote ends at Midnight Saturday but the videos will remain up indefinitely. https://www.punoff2020.com/

A few weeks from now we will fire up 16 contenders for the PUNSLINGERS portion of our competition. This will be conducted LIVE on Saturday, November 21st. I hope to offer more details soon about how (and why) we will be attempting this awesome feat, but you can pre-Zoom some of us will soon be getting our feats wit as we wade in over our heads and go off the deep end. 

Visit our website often for much more of this same sort of insanity.

And if you’re still hungry for more... We always seem to be at play on our PUN INTENSIVE podcast. This is the best way to keep your puns portable.  http://punintensive.com/

Gary (Leerless Feeder) Hallock

--
Gary (Immodest Moderator) Hallock, Leerless Feeder


Rogue Riddle 1045 Yeah, I'm Game. Dancers #RogueRiddle

gregg s
 

Proving that there is no such thing as an unlucky number, the winner is Lars with 13. Gary in second with 10.

Dancers:


CONNECT 4/CON NICKED 4
BACCARAT/BACK A RAT
CHUTES AND LADDERS/SHOOTS AND LADDERS
BATTLESHIP/BAT, TELL SHEP
OPERATION/OPERA RAY SHUN
EUCHRE/YOU CUR
CROSSWORD/CROSS WORD
POKEMON/POKEY, MAN
MAGIC 8 BALL/MAGIC ATE BALL
CRIBBAGE/CRIB AGE
FORTNITE/FORT KNIGHT
PAC-MAN/PACK, MAN!
SUDOKU/SO, DUKE, WHO?
GIN RUMMY/GIN, ROOMIE?
OUIJA BOARD/WEE JAR BORED (And a reminder that OuiJa means Yes Yes. Si?)

Lars your prize money is on the way. Do not pass go. Or gas.


Rogue Riddle 1045 Yeah, I'm Game. LETTER COUNTS FOR ALL AND FOR ALL A GOOD NIGHT #RogueRiddle

gregg s
 



1.
The criminal stole slightly more than 3 of them. 7,1 /3,6,1

2. What you do if you support a stoolie 8/ 4,1,3

3. So if someone takes target practice right before creating a sensible staggered dividend-based stock portfolio, their activities, in the present tense, can be described as this. 6,3,7/6,3,7

 

4. Order the Bacardi mascot to impart information to a former senior FOX journalist who left in late 2019. 10/3,4,4

 

5. The Three Tenors abhor the sun’s uv light, so it’s this. 9 / 5,3,4

 

6. You Dog! You Mongrel! And Then? 6/3,3

7. NAZARENVS, for one   9 / 5,4

8. It’s Gumby’s horse pal, dude! 7/5,3

9. If for some reason Earvin Johnson consumed the pill, you might exclaim this, especially if you left an article out in a poorly grammatical way.   5,1,4 / 5,3,4

 

10. You shouldn’t reuse a baby’s sleeping apparataus years later, due to this 8/4,3

11. A citadel named for the horsey in chess 8/4,6

12. You better put your clothes and other needed items in that suitcase, dude! 3-3/4,3!

13. You confront John Wayne, call him by his nickname, and casually inquire as to the correct party.  6 / 2,4,3?

 

14. If you wanted to offer your co-resident a clear liquor, you’d ask this, perhaps. 3,5/3,6?

15. A tiny glass container that is experiencing ennui. Got it? Yes? Yes!   5,5 / 3,3,5


Rogue Riddle 1045 Yeah, I'm Game. #RogueRiddle

gregg s
 

Going into the homely stretch, Lars and Gary H. are neck(ish) and neck(ish) with 12 and 10 respectively.

 

On this side of the puzzle, I note that my answer matrix column between them has been almost a mirror image—that is, each one of these clearly clever dudes has solved several that the other one has not been able to. Their minds focus very differently.

 

I find this fascinating.

 

As the puzzle writer, I note that at least one person has solved every clue, which tells me that each one is arms-length doable so they all track and there are no excuses. So, with 24+ hours to go, I expect that someone will get all 15 between now and then.

 

Will it be Lars, Gary…or someone else? 24 hours seems like PLENTY of time to knock these all out. Or, knock the the rest of them out as the case may be.

 

How about a little incentive—$10,000 to the winner.

 

$10,000. Payable upon request in the form of emailed photos of, if my math is right, 20 Monopoly $500 bills.

 

I promised I would get Monopoly into this game-themed RR somehow.


O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships

James Ertner
 

Use this website: www.punoff2020.com and click on "The Contest."

Jim



On October 20, 2020, at 11:10 AM, "One Sagan via groups.io" <one_sagan@...> wrote:


When I click on the link I get a warning notice:

Your connection is not private

This server could not prove that it is www.punpunpun.com; its security certificate is from *.webfaction.com. This may be caused by a misconfiguration or an attacker intercepting your connection.

NET::ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID

Here I am One Sagan


On Saturday, October 17, 2020, 12:00:03 AM CDT, main@puny.groups.io Calendar <noreply@groups.io> wrote:


O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships

When:
Saturday, 17 October 2020

Where:
Austin, TX

Description:
The 43rd Annual O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships, information to be found at http://www.punpunpun.com


Re: O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships - Sat, 10/17/2020 #cal-notice

One Sagan
 

When I click on the link I get a warning notice:

Your connection is not private

This server could not prove that it is www.punpunpun.com; its security certificate is from *.webfaction.com. This may be caused by a misconfiguration or an attacker intercepting your connection.

NET::ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID

Here I am One Sagan


On Saturday, October 17, 2020, 12:00:03 AM CDT, main@puny.groups.io Calendar <noreply@groups.io> wrote:


O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships

When:
Saturday, 17 October 2020

Where:
Austin, TX

Description:
The 43rd Annual O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships, information to be found at http://www.punpunpun.com


Rogue Riddle 1045 Yeah, I'm Game. #RogueRiddle

gregg s
 

OK, let’s see. Leading the pack is a man well known for his gaminess, Lars with 10. Place and Show thus far: Gary H. follows with 7 and Adam with 5.

 

Few things.

 

One. All of these games are pretty well known, mostly old board or card games or newspaper level, one current trendy video game I believe and it is the most popular one. There should be nothing here you never heard of or played at one time.

 

Two. Wordplay-wise, nothing complicated or intricate here either. These are all punny puns, all I have—or would or will—use at Pun Slingers type deals. You, perhaps, will too.

 

Three. I am extending the deadline to Wednesday at Midnight ET. 11 CT. I have no idea if that’s Standard or Daylight. Whatever it is or will be on Wednesday.

 

Four. Here are a few word counts for some of the harder nuts to crack, evidently:

 

5. 9 / 5,3,4

 

7. 9 / 5,4

 

9. 5,1,4 / 5,3,4

 

13. 6 / 2,4,3?

 

15. 5,5 / 3,3,5


Rogue Riddle 1045 Yeah, I'm Game. #RogueRiddle

gregg s
 

 

Feeling like a Pyrrhic leader here, with the prize for winning RR 1044 getting to do more work. Yay!

 

OK I’m still the new guy—wide-tailed, bushy-eyed and still maybe two RRs away from jaded.

 

But let me just say, I really appreciate Gary H. going easy on me as a competitor and letting the new guy win. And by such a big margin. Really big, BIG margin. Huge really. Hey you math guys—would a winning margin of this incomprehensibly ginormous size constitute an “order of magnitude?” A myriad perhaps? A plethora? In any case, way to make it look legit!

 

Re: RR 1044, with his brain-teasing, spooneristic ways, author Hans Larsen may have exhausted my enfeebled brain, but he certainly hasn’t exhausted the universe of punnable games. Herewith in RR 1045 are 13 more—so why don't you play the dozens. With a Plus 1.

 

Here there be board games, video games, card games, puzzley games, online games.

 

Are you game?

 

Take your shot, Hamilton.

 

P.S. If you want to see the single best 2 minute pun soliloquy ever performed, go check out the on-line O. Henry at https://www.punoff2020.com/ And while you’re there, you can view mine also.

 

P.P.S. Anyone else keep thinking that it’s “O’Henry?” Irish I could stop doing that.

 

P.P.P.S. I’m told I need to pronounce a deadline. So, let’s say, what, end of day Tuesday, whatever that means to you.

 

 

1. The criminal stole slightly more than 3 of them.

2. What you do if you support a stoolie

3. So if someone takes target practice right before creating a sensible staggered dividend-based stock portfolio, their activities, in the present tense, can be described as this.

 

4. Order the Bacardi mascot to impart information to a former senior FOX journalist who left in late 2019.

 

5. The Three Tenors abhor the sun’s uv light, so it’s this.

6. You Dog! You Mongrel! And Then?

7. NAZARENVS, for one

8. It’s Gumby’s horse pal, dude!

9. If for some reason Earvin Johnson consumed the pill, you might exclaim this, especially if you left an article out in a poorly grammatical way.

 

10. You shouldn’t reuse a baby’s sleeping apparataus years later, due to this

11. A citadel named for the horsey in chess

12. You better put your clothes and other needed items in that suitcase, dude!

13. You confront John Wayne, call him by his nickname, and casually inquire as to the correct party.

 

14. If you wanted to offer your co-resident a clear liquor, you’d ask this, perhaps.

15. A tiny glass container that is experiencing ennui. Got it? Yes? Yes!

 

Um, did I mention that I am not good at math? Evidently, that includes counting things.


Rogue Riddle 1045 Yeah, I'm Game. #RogueRiddle

gregg s
 

Um, hello. Test, test. A Rogue Riddle set will be emitted shortly. To all but about five of the 143 people receiving this, evidently, that means nothing. This is the list for people interested in puns and who are under the impression that they’re good at them, right? Or is PUNY a veiled reference to the size of yalls relative punning skills? Puny as in teeny. Teeny as in tiny. Tiny as in, uh, wait a second…

 

undersizedunderdeveloped, undernourished, underfed, stunted, slight, small, little, diminutive, dwarfish, pygmy; weakfeeble, weakly, sickly, delicate, frail, fragile; informal weedy, pint-sized. ANTONYMS strong, sturdy. the men were jeering at the villagers' puny efforts to save their homespitifulpitiable, inadequate, negligible, insufficient, scant, scanty, derisory, miserable, sorry, wretched, meager, paltry, trifling, trivial, insignificant, inconsequential, petty; informal pathetic, measly, piddling, piffling, mingy, poxy, dinky; rare exiguous. ANTONYMS  significant, sizeable, substantial

 

OK, trash talk isn’t my strong suit. Still trying to find out what is. I make good a flank steak. Honey garlic shrimp too. Maybe making puns? Come see what’s cooking. I’m slaving over a hot stove here for you. Dinner will be served shortly.